Tags: health*

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  1. If we can breathe in these micro- and nano-sized particles and fibres, the scientists conjecture, they are likely to get into the human bloodstream, lung tissue and breast milk, or become lodged in the gut and respiratory systems. Some microparticles may pass through the body without causing harm, others may lodge there dangerously. Many are suspected to be carcinogenic or to have hormone-disrupting properties.

    The consensus is that there are great gaps in what we know about how microplastics affect human health, and that we need more robust science. We don’t know the risk when we drink contaminated bottled or tap water every day. We don’t know how much we are ingesting or breathing, or what effect exposure to hazardous plastic particles may have over years. We don’t know the concentrations that are safe for adults, let alone infants. There is mounting concern that under-studied microplastic particles threaten health by presenting a potentially major source of toxic chemicals to the human body.
    https://amp.theguardian.com/commentis...risis-urgent-recycling-bottles-no-fix
    Tags: , , , by M. Fioretti (2018-03-31)
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  2. Humans may have reached their maximum limits for height, lifespan and physical performance. A recent review suggests humans have biological limitations, and that anthropogenic impacts on the environment — including climate change — could have a deleterious effect on these limits. Published in Frontiers in Physiology, this review is the first of its kind spanning 120 years worth of historical information, while considering the effects of both genetic and environmental parameters.
    https://blog.frontiersin.org/2017/12/...n-performance-frontiers-in-physiology
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  3. The goal is to modify and adapt one of the Magic Candy Factory’s existing 3D printers so it can produce personalized medicines, mainly geared toward children, but with the ability to print precise doses, a combination of multiple drugs, and different formulations, like capsules and chewables.

    “A major limitation of medicines today is that they are only manufactured in a limited number of strengths,” the campaign page reads. “But, what if we need a dose that is not available on the market? This is of special importance to children and the elderly. The tablets and capsules we take every day are not designed with children in mind, often making administration difficult.”

    Incorrect doses, terrible taste, and being difficult to swallow are only a few of the issues doctors, and parents, face when trying to give children safe and effective medicine. The campaign quotes UNICEF when it says that 10 million kids under the age of five will die this year, and that 67% of that massive number could be saved by specific pediatric products, like better medicine.
    https://3dprint.com/196567/personalized-kickstarter-campaigns
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  4. The implications of this study are important. Only 2% of Americans do not eat any animal products. (This number has not changed appreciably for 20 years). Further, the fact that five out of six vegetarians go back to eating meat suggests that an all-veggie diet is very hard for most people to maintain over the long haul. Hence, the authors of the report argue that animal protectionists would be better off concentrating their efforts to persuade “the many” to reduce their consumption of flesh than trying to convince “the few” to take the absolutist route and give up meat completely. Sounds right to me.
    https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/...egetarians-and-vegans-return-meat-why
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  5. Their warning came as the Olympic torch made its way around Latin America’s largest country, which has already passed the 100-day countdown to the opening ceremony.

    “The fire is already burning, but that is not a rationale not to do anything about the Olympics,” said Amir Attaran, a professor at the University of Ottawa who is one of the letter’s authors. “It is not the time now to throw more gasoline on to the fire.”
    http://www.theguardian.com/world/2016...mpics-due-to-zika-outbreak?CMP=twt_gu
    Tags: , , , , by M. Fioretti (2016-05-28)
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  6. Extreme fitness programs can be dangerous in a variety of ways: They are bad for your body, decrease life expectancy, and are associated with a high rate of injury. As fitness instructor Erin Simmons argued in a 2014 article on CrossFit, crash exercising can be a gift to doctors because it “means job security for medical professionals.” Simmons spoke with a number of “strength and conditioning coaches” about the rise of regimes like CrossFit and “not a single one of them” would recommend it. She continues, “These same athletic trainers warn every single athlete against CrossFit and tell them the health risks of being involved in it.”

    With the extreme risks and financial burden associated with looking like Steve Rogers, it’s worth asking: Is this emphasis on getting big at all costs making us any happier? In 2015, a BBC report noted that “bigorexia” (more accurately known as “muscle dysphoria”) is on the rise in young men. Rob Willson, who serves as the president of the Body Dysmorphic Disorder Foundation, told the BBC: “We know about 10 percent of men in the gym may have muscle dysmorphia.” Dr. Michele Kerulis of Adler School of Professional Psychology told The Daily Mail that rate may be even higher: She claimed as many as 45 percent of frequent male gym goers male suffer from disordered body image.

    That estimate seems very high, but it’s impossible to ignore the fact that male body standards have changed dramatically since Superman looked like George Reeves, rather than a human action figure.
    http://www.salon.com/2016/05/11/the_r...or_and_captain_america_is_hurting_men
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  7. Together they’ve used an Ultimaker 2+ to create a smartphone retinal imaging adapter and anterior segment adapter. These cheap adapters are capable of achieving the same diagnoses as complicated hospital machines, like slit lens microscopes and fundus cameras, that costs many tens of thousands of dollars. These incredible open source 3D printed devices are capable of achieving a 40 degree field of view with 10 times magnification – perfect for examining the intricacies of the human eye. And as it’s open source, anyone in the world can download it, print it and use it.

    Creating a $50 imaging kit in just 4 hours Creating a $50 imaging kit in just 4 hours Creating a $50 imaging kit in just 4 hours

    Creating a $50 imaging kit in just 4 hours



    With just a few accessories such as a couple of inexpensive lenses and nuts and bolts, these adapters can be assembled in under 10 minutes. Once done, all you need to do is clip them on to the top of the smartphone and turn on the oDocs Eye app. That’s it. You now have a fully functioning eye examination kit for around $50.
    http://www.createeducation.co.uk/stor...ource=twitter.com&utm_campaign=buffer
    Tags: , , , by M. Fioretti (2016-05-02)
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  8. Developed by Ohio-based pharmaceutical company Aprecia, Spritam levetiracetam is a new drug to control seizures brought on by epilepsy. Approved by the US Food and Drug Administration this week, it employs the company’s trademark “ZipDose” technology, which uses 3D printing to create a more porous pill. Its structure means the pill dissolves more quickly on contact with liquid, making it much easier to swallow high doses than a conventional tablet.

    The 3D printing process also allows layers of medication to be packaged more tightly in precise dosages, and it points to a future of more personalised medicine. 3D-printed pills could be custom-ordered, based on specific patient needs, rather than on a one-drug-fits-all approach.

    “For the last 50 years, we have manufactured tablets in factories and shipped them to hospitals,” said Dr Mohamed Albed Alhnan, a lecturer in pharmaceutics at the University of Central Lancashire. “For the first time, this process means we can produce tablets much closer to the patient.”

    Researchers at the School of Pharmacy of University College London have been developing a technique to 3D-print pills in different shapes, from pyramids to doughnuts, using a technique known as “hot melt extrusion”. The different forms, which would be hard to manufacture using standard production techniques, release drugs at different rates. Their research has found that the rate of drug release is dependent not on surface area, but on the surface area-to-volume ratio. A pyramid-shaped pill, for example, releases a drug slower than a cube or a sphere, allowing absorption to be controlled.
    http://www.theguardian.com/artanddesi...s-up-a-world-of-downloadable-medicine
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  9. Embè? Adesso viene il bello. Il babbo condivide la notizia su Twitter, e scopre (cito testualmente in NYT) “una moltitudine di genitori che vogliono trasformare/integrare strumentazione commerciale in soluzioni ‘fatte in casa’, artigianali. Questo ‘movimento’ ha messo in moto una spinta forte, egualitaria, che mira a migliorare la tecnologia per la gestione della cura del diabete, un fenomeno fino ad ora poco presente nel mondo top-down della strumentazione medicale.’ User-driven innovation!
    http://www.economyup.it/blog/3910_do-...novation-una-storia-straordinaria.htm
    Tags: , by M. Fioretti (2016-03-04)
    Voting 0
  10. News of the poisoned water crisis in Flint has reached a wide audience around the world. The basics are now known: the Republican governor, Rick Snyder, nullified the free elections in Flint, deposed the mayor and city council, then appointed his own man to run the city. To save money, they decided to unhook the people of Flint from their fresh water drinking source, Lake Huron, and instead, make the public drink from the toxic Flint River.
    http://ecowatch.com/2016/01/30/michael-moore-flint
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