Tags: free software*

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  1. Now that Bangladesh is becoming a middle-income country, our widespread software piracy is unlikely to be permitted for much longer. Bangladeshi law already makes software piracy illegal.

    Enforcement of the law has been overlooked until now, but will not continue forever. Especially with Bangladesh continuously lobbying US trade authorities for lower duties and tariffs for the exports of its ready-made garment factories, it is only a matter of time before American companies, such as Microsoft, insist that their intellectual property rights be enforced as a prerequisite for better trade access.
    http://www.dhakatribune.com/opinion/2...1/15/barcelona-moving-linux-not-dhaka
    Voting 0
  2. Android is a mostly free operating system developed mainly by Google. Unfortunately, the drivers for most devices and most applications from the "market" are not free (as in free speech, not free beer). They frequently work against the interest of the users, spy on them, and sometimes cannot even be removed.

    This campaign can help you to regain control of your Android device and your data. We collect information about running an Android system as free as possible and try to coordinate the efforts in this area.

    You want a mobile device that is really yours when you bought it? You want a mobile device that does not spy on you and hands over your data to big corporations? Then read on!
    https://fsfe.org/campaigns/android/android.en.html
    Tags: , , by M. Fioretti (2017-12-15)
    Voting 0
  3. The idea is to use the Arc™ as a single manager for your passwords, encrypted notes, files and -all the secret things here- while hosting arcd yourself on some spare hardware like a Raspberry Pi and accessing arc from every device with a modern browser, so let’s see how to configure it on a Raspberry Pi Zero in order to have a secure and portable setup for your secrets! :D
    https://www.evilsocket.net/2017/12/07...the-ARC-Project/#.WimFjC49icA.twitter
    Voting 0
  4. There are a number of video editors available for Linux. You can use them for professional video editing. Some of those tools are also used for editing Hollywood movies.

    But as a regular desktop Linux user, you might not need a feature-rich video editor. Because the more features an editor has, the more complex it becomes.

    When all you gotta do is a few cuts here and there and trimming out the shaky parts of that birthday video, a full-fledged video editor might be an overkill. This is where LosslessCut comes to save your day or night, whichever it is.
    https://itsfoss.com/losslesscut-video-cutter
    Voting 0
  5. In my introduction to ImageMagick, I showed how to use the application's menus to edit and add effects to your images. In this follow-up, I'll show additional ways to use this open source image editor to view your images.
    https://opensource.com/article/17/9/imagemagick-viewing-images
    Voting 0
  6. Not all of this made sense to me. Unity 8 was needed because Unity 7 depends on Compiz and is not well-suited for working on a variety of form factors with rotating displays and so on. But the only job Mir had was to replace X.Org and SurfaceFlinger, so Unity 8 could use a single API on PCs and mobile devices. I’m not an expert on graphics technologies and APIs, but at least from a “we are quite short on manpower” standpoint it feels like coming up with a whole new display server which noone else wants to use and doesn’t add much over the existing alternatives should have been avoided at all costs. Especially when the user never sees the difference. Ubuntu Touch had been happily using Android’s SurfaceFlinger until the end of 2013.
    http://www.lieberbiber.de/2017/06/20/...ubuntu-for-mobile-devices-post-mortem
    Voting 0
  7. Da semplice utente ad admin di un social network

    Creare un’istanza Mastodon non è un’attività che richiede molto tempo, per chi ha delle basi tecniche ed un minimo di competenze su Linux, ma prima di cimentarsi nell’installazione e gestione di un server che ha comunque un certo livello di complessità, provate a vedere se vi piace partecipando alla comunità mastodon.partecipa.digital (link: https://mastodon.partecipa.digital).

    Ho creato quell’istanza Mastodon perché, da buon tecnico, preferisco testare e valutare in modo approfondito qualcosa prima di parlarne e raccomandarlo e
    devo dire che sia del punto di vista funzionale che tecnico sono veramente soddisfatto.

    Se, invece di essere semplici utilizzatori, volete diventare amministratori del “vostro Twitter” ho preparato una guida in Italiano (link: https://www.partecipa.digital/8-mastodon-it/1-installare-mastodon-su-debian-8) che vi aiuterà ad installare Mastodon.
    http://www.techeconomy.it/2017/05/18/...todon-alternativa-open-source-twitter
    Voting 0
  8. Published on April 23, 2017Featured in: Big Ideas & Innovation, Career Development, Editor's Picks, Recruiting & Hiring, Software Engineering, Technology

    Shelly Palmer - CEO at The Palmer Group

    Clients want us to deliver online experiences that are competitive with Facebook, Amazon, Netflix and Google, and other top-tier tech companies because that’s what consumers demand. This has created a war for talent unlike anything I’ve seen in my career. While it must be fought, it can never be won because the rules are not what they seem.

    Our clients want web and native experiences that look, feel, and perform like they were built by Facebook, Netflix, Microsoft, Google, Apple, etc. (and the back ends to support them). Each of these companies build with very specific programming languages and frameworks.

    If you want to build a project for a client that looks and feels as good as Facebook, why wouldn’t you use their code?

    They have massive teams of designers and engineers with unique combinations of aesthetics, aptitude, and technical skills. So, we are on a Grail Quest for similar talent – the best of the best React/Redux specialists, Unity developers, data scientists, and data engineers (proficient with TensorFlow), technical project managers (who used to do the above, but have evolved into managers), and technical account executives.

    The problem is, if you’re good enough to work for us, you’re good enough to work for them, or anyone else for that matter. And while we have done our best to build a yellow brick road to our company, the yellow brick road that leads to top-tier tech actually has a metaphoric Emerald City at its end.

    Don’t get me wrong; we have a small but mighty team and we fight considerably above our weight. But if we could win the talent war (or even just a few more battles), our growth potential would be unlimited. The last three perfect candidates took jobs at Google and Facebook instead of coming to work for us … not a big surprise.
    The Game Is Rigged

    Over the past few years, IT old-timers have started to accept open source as an excellent way to economically test, fail, and learn. GitHub (the most popular open source community) is a haven for engineers. If you write great code, you are rewarded by popularity, as well as the accolades of your peers. It is one of the purest meritocracies in the world.

    GitHub is also the place where top-tier tech companies make would-be proprietary programming languages, frameworks, and tools available for free – a Machiavellian move that allows engineers to self-select into a pool of qualified applicants perfectly trained to work for them.

    And, here’s why the rules are not what they seem: if you build something popular on GitHub using Facebook’s or Google’s code, they will see it, and a recruiter will contact you. That’s how the “GitHub recruiting pipeline” works.
    We Run a Business, Not a School

    I am personally amazed by the number of recruiters who have sent us “vetted” professional coders who can’t actually code. This is such a serious problem that if a recruiter sends us three candidates who cannot pass our coding test, we fire the recruiter. We can’t afford to waste the time.

    Tech recruiters charge 18 to 25 percent of the first year’s salary, but even the best recruiters we’ve worked with cannot truly vet the types of engineers we need. As far as I can tell, recruiters are not under pressure to learn, because high-end tech talent is so rare, hiring managers will take practically anyone who can fog a mirror. We won’t. And you shouldn’t.

    In practice, we could train these workers, but not at market prices with added recruiter vigorish. We just can’t get enough value out of B-team players while they are in training, and by the time we help them become A-team players, their GitHub accounts and contributions will reflect their learning. At that point, they will be firmly on the radar of top-tier tech. And we would have played the role of pre-school for Facebook, Google, or Apple. Great for Zuck, Larry, or Tim, but not so great for us.
    There Must Be Somewhere to Learn This Stuff

    There is somewhere to learn this stuff. You learn it by doing it every day and communicating with the community that is doing it every day. It’s not taught in schools and it is constantly evolving. In fact, this may be top-tier tech’s secret weapon. Just like Tim Cook (Apple) owns the physical supply chain for every component you might need to make a smartphone, top-tier tech literally owns the programming languages and frameworks used to create them – even though they are free for all of us to use.
    Awesome and Insane

    None of this would be an issue if top-tier tech did not make its code available open source. We have this problem only because they need talent as much as we do.

    That said, we’re going to keep looking for amazing programmers and my offer stands. I can’t wait to pay you $500,000 per year. You just have to be an awesome and insane engineer with enough skills and work ethic to keep the work we do for our clients as good as the work at the biggest and best tech companies in the world.

    Feel free to send me a link to your GitHub account. No resumes required.

    A note from the author before you write a comment: It seems that some commenters are worried that I do not understand that there is more to talent recruiting and retention than money. I understand that very well, which is why we are blessed to work with some of the most talented people in the world. This article is about a narrow issue -- a lack of engineers with very specific, highly in-demand skill sets. It attempts to explain how top tier tech has strategically monopolized an incredibly important recruiting pipeline using open source. On that subject, I would welcome your thoughts.
    https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/id-pay...feed%3BEUyQSvA8n%2FVCJ6VKA6QJ2w%3D%3D
    Tags: , , by M. Fioretti (2017-04-24)
    Voting 0
  9. Growing Ubuntu for Cloud and IoT, rather than Phone and convergence

    By Canonical on 5 April 2017
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    This is a post by Mark Shuttleworth, Founder of Ubuntu and Canonical

    We are wrapping up an excellent quarter and an excellent year for the company, with performance in many teams and products that we can be proud of. As we head into the new fiscal year, it’s appropriate to reassess each of our initiatives. I’m writing to let you know that we will end our investment in Unity8, the phone and convergence shell. We will shift our default Ubuntu desktop back to GNOME for Ubuntu 18.04 LTS.

    I’d like to emphasise our ongoing passion for, investment in, and commitment to, the Ubuntu desktop that millions rely on. We will continue to produce the most usable open source desktop in the world, to maintain the existing LTS releases, to work with our commercial partners to distribute that desktop, to support our corporate customers who rely on it, and to delight the millions of IoT and cloud developers who innovate on top of it.

    We care that Ubuntu is widely useful to people who use Linux every day, for personal or commercial projects. That’s why we maintain a wide range of Ubuntu flavours from both Canonical and the Ubuntu community, and why we have invested in the Ubuntu Phone.

    I took the view that, if convergence was the future and we could deliver it as free software, that would be widely appreciated both in the free software community and in the technology industry, where there is substantial frustration with the existing, closed, alternatives available to manufacturers. I was wrong on both counts.
    In the community, our efforts were seen fragmentation not innovation. And industry has not rallied to the possibility, instead taking a ‘better the devil you know’ approach to those form factors, or investing in home-grown platforms. What the Unity8 team has delivered so far is beautiful, usable and solid, but I respect that markets, and community, ultimately decide which products grow and which disappear.

    The cloud and IoT story for Ubuntu is excellent and continues to improve. You all probably know that most public cloud workloads, and most private Linux cloud infrastructures, depend on Ubuntu. You might also know that most of the IoT work in auto, robotics, networking, and machine learning is also on Ubuntu, with Canonical providing commercial services on many of those initiatives. The number and size of commercial engagements around Ubuntu on cloud and IoT has grown materially and consistently.

    This has been, personally, a very difficult decision, because of the force of my conviction in the convergence future, and my personal engagement with the people and the product, both of which are amazing. We feel like a family, but this choice is shaped by commercial constraints, and those two are hard to reconcile.

    The choice, ultimately, is to invest in the areas which are contributing to the growth of the company. Those are Ubuntu itself, for desktops, servers and VMs, our cloud infrastructure products (OpenStack and Kubernetes) our cloud operations capabilities (MAAS, LXD, Juju, BootStack), and our IoT story in snaps and Ubuntu Core. All of those have communities, customers, revenue and growth, the ingredients for a great and independent company, with scale and momentum. This is the time for us to ensure, across the board, that we have the fitness and rigour for that path.
    https://insights.ubuntu.com/2017/04/0...iot-rather-than-phone-and-convergence
    Voting 0
  10. Enlarge / Unity 8, an option in the Ubuntu 16.10 desktop, will never become the default.

    Six years after making Unity the default user interface on Ubuntu desktops, Canonical is giving up on the project and will switch the default Ubuntu desktop back to GNOME next year. Canonical is also ending development of Ubuntu software for phones and tablets, spelling doom for the goal of creating a converged experience with phones acting as desktops when docked with the right equipment.

    Canonical founder Mark Shuttleworth explained the move in a blog post Wednesday. "I’m writing to let you know that we will end our investment in Unity8, the phone and convergence shell," he wrote. "We will shift our default Ubuntu desktop back to GNOME for Ubuntu 18.04 LTS," which will ship in April 2018.
    Further Reading
    Why Ubuntu’s creator still invests his fortune in an unprofitable company

    This is a return to the early years of Ubuntu, when the desktop shipped with GNOME instead of a Canonical-developed user interface. Shuttleworth's blog post didn't specifically say that phone and tablet development is ending. But Canonical Community Manager Michael Hall confirmed to Ars that the Ubuntu phone and tablet project is over.

    "Work on the phone and tablet is also ending, the whole convergence story, really," Hall said. "The desktop will continue, but like it was in the pre-Unity days where we took what upstream developers » designed and developed."
    Ubuntu phone concept from January 2013.
    Ubuntu phone concept from January 2013.
    Canonical

    Ubuntu phones and laptops never became popular with hardware makers, carriers, or consumers, and software development seemed to be slowing down. While Unity 8 was shipping on phones and tablets, it has never been stable enough to become the default on the desktop, which uses Unity 7. Canonical's work on creating a new desktop display server, Mir, has also been slow.

    By switching to GNOME, Canonical is also giving up on Mir and moving to the Wayland display server, another contender for replacing the X window system. Given the separate development paths of Mir and Wayland, "we have no real choice but to use Wayland when Ubuntu switches to GNOME by default," Hall told Ars. "Using Mir simply isn't an option we have."
    Despite phone failure, Ubuntu is a hit in the cloud

    Canonical has found financial success in the business IT market, particularly with server and cloud software. Shuttleworth said killing off Unity is "a very difficult decision" for him personally, "but this choice is shaped by commercial constraints, and those two are hard to reconcile."

    Shuttleworth made it clear that mobile isn't the financial future of the company. He wrote:

    The cloud and IoT story for Ubuntu is excellent and continues to improve. You all probably know that most public cloud workloads, and most private Linux cloud infrastructures, depend on Ubuntu. You might also know that most of the IoT work in auto, robotics, networking, and machine learning is also on Ubuntu, with Canonical providing commercial services on many of those initiatives. The number and size of commercial engagements around Ubuntu on cloud and IoT has grown materially and consistently.

    ...

    The choice, ultimately, is to invest in the areas which are contributing to the growth of the company. Those are Ubuntu itself, for desktops, servers and VMs, our cloud infrastructure products (OpenStack and Kubernetes) our cloud operations capabilities (MAAS, LXD, Juju, BootStack), and our IoT story in snaps and Ubuntu Core. All of those have communities, customers, revenue and growth, the ingredients for a great and independent company, with scale and momentum. This is the time for us to ensure, across the board, that we have the fitness and rigour for that path.

    This doesn't mean that Canonical is ending desktop development, he wrote. "We will continue to produce the most usable open source desktop in the world, to maintain the existing LTS releases, to work with our commercial partners to distribute that desktop, to support our corporate customers who rely on it, and to delight the millions of IoT and cloud developers who innovate on top of it," Shuttleworth wrote.

    Shuttleworth acknowledged that Canonical's work on Unity instead of GNOME was viewed as "fragmentation" in the Linux community. While Shuttleworth praised the work done by Canonical's Unity 8 team, he said that "markets, and community, ultimately decide which products grow and which disappear."

    In 2013, Shuttleworth told Ars that Canonical could be profitable if it trimmed itself down to focus on its most successful lines of business. But he kept investing money in Canonical because of his phone ambitions. He even predicted that "the desktop on its own will die" without a mobile counterpart. But nearly four years later, phones have not killed PCs, and it doesn't appear that the death of the Ubuntu phone will have any long-term impact on the Ubuntu desktop's viability.
    https://arstechnica.com/information-t...p-will-switch-back-to-gnome-next-year
    Voting 0

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