Tags: facebook*

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  1. Here’s how this golden age of speech actually works: In the 21st century, the capacity to spread ideas and reach an audience is no longer limited by access to expensive, centralized broadcasting infrastructure. It’s limited instead by one’s ability to garner and distribute attention. And right now, the flow of the world’s attention is structured, to a vast and overwhelming degree, by just a few digital platforms: Facebook, Google (which owns YouTube), and, to a lesser extent, Twitter.

    These companies—which love to hold themselves up as monuments of free expression—have attained a scale unlike anything the world has ever seen; they’ve come to dominate media


    Not to put too fine a point on it, but all of this invalidates much of what we think about free speech—conceptually, legally, and ethically.

    The most effective forms of censorship today involve meddling with trust and attention, not muzzling speech itself.

    What’s more, all this online speech is no longer public in any traditional sense. Sure, Facebook and Twitter sometimes feel like places where masses of people experience things together simultaneously. But in reality, posts are targeted and delivered privately, screen by screen by screen.
    https://www.wired.com/story/free-speech-issue-tech-turmoil-new-censorship
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  2. CEO Mark Zuckerberg wrote on Facebook today, “I’m changing the goal I give our product teams from focusing on helping you find relevant content to helping you have more meaningful social interactions.” VP of News Feed Adam Mosseri tells TechCrunch “I expect that the amount of distribution for publishers will go down because a lot of publisher content is just passively consumed and not talked about. Overall time on Facebook will decrease, but we think this is the right thing to do.”

    The winners in this change will be users and their sense of community, since they should find Facebook more rewarding and less of a black hole of wasted time viewing mindless video clips and guilty-pleasure articles. And long-term, it should preserve Facebook’s business and ensure it still has a platform to provide referral traffic for news publishers and marketers, albeit less than before.

    The biggest losers will be publishers who’ve shifted resources to invest in eye-catching pre-recorded social videos, because Mosseri says “video is such a passive experience”. He admits that he expects publishers to react with “a certain amount of scrutiny and anxiety”, but didn’t have many concrete answers about how publishers should scramble to react beyond “experimenting . . . and seeing . . what content gets more comments, more likes, more reshares.”
    https://techcrunch.com/2018/01/11/facebook-time-well-spent
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  3. Most of Facebook’s uncanny guesswork is the result of a healthy percentage of users simply handing over their address books.

    But that doesn’t mean Facebook hasn’t thought about employing users’ metadata more strategically to make connections between them. Patents filed by Facebook that mention People You May Know show some ingenious methods that Facebook has devised for figuring out that seeming strangers on the network might know each other. One filed in 2015 describes a technique that would connect two people through the camera metadata associated with the photos they uploaded. It might assume two people knew each other if the images they uploaded looked like they were titled in the same series of photos—IMG_4605739.jpg and IMG_4605742, for example—or if lens scratches or dust were detectable in the same spots on the photos, revealing the photos were taken by the same camera.

    It would result in all the people you’ve sent photos to, who then uploaded them to Facebook, showing up in one another’s “People You May Know.” It’d be a great way to meet the other people who hired your wedding photographer.
    https://gizmodo.com/facebook-knows-ho...you-using-the-dust-on-your-1821030620
    Tags: , , , by M. Fioretti (2018-01-13)
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  4. Come è possibile fatturare 18 miliardi con 20mila dipendenti?

    Per esempio, una foto fornisce luogo e ora del caricamento e dello scatto, oltre che la marca dello smartphone. Una miniera di dati che Facebook – come agenzia pubblicitaria – rivende ai suoi clienti inserzionisti. “Se carico la foto del mio gatto, visualizzerò con ogni probabilità inserzioni di cibo per animali. Ma se carico la foto alle 4 del mattino, potrei essere inserito nel segmento dei nottambuli e ricevere pubblicità di prodotti contro l’insonnia”, spiega Casilli.

    Nel quarto trimestre del 2016, l’azienda di Mark Zuckerberg ha guadagnato 4,83 dollari per utente. Nel 2015 ha fatturato 17,93 milioni di dollari l’anno con circa 20mila dipendenti fissi. Come è possibile? Grazie a 1,86 miliardi di lavoratori invisibili, cioè tutti noi che ogni giorno carichiamo contenuti consapevolmente e creiamo metriche pubblicitarie senza rendercene conto.
    https://www.terrelibere.org/facebook-pagami
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  5. Le ragioni sono molte. Uno dei punti messi sul tappeto ruota proprio intorno ai social network come Facebook e Instagram. Queste piattaforme hanno reso molto semplice confrontarsi con altre persone e soprattutto innescato una sorta di competizione sbilanciata e reciproca, basata su ciò che vediamo sulle bacheche che, come noto, non sempre rispecchia esattamente la vita reale. Piuttosto, l'immagine che gli "amici" intendono dare di se stessi, spesso lavorandoci in profondità. La tendenza alla competizione non è certo prerogativa delle piattaforma ma è innata all'essere umano già in età prescolare. Il problema, semmai, è che - come hanno denunciato molti ex manager delle piattaforme poi sganciati dalle loro creature - quei social sfruttano le debolezze psicologiche per innescare anche queste forme di atteggiamenti e reazioni.

    I Millennials hanno dunque a disposizione un'enorme quantità di "metriche" per giudicare la propria esistenza. Senz'altro molte di più dei loro genitori. Like, follower e "amici" sono una di queste. Difficile capire come se ne possa uscire o almeno provare a fare un passo indietro da questo circolo vizioso. Il primo passo, suggerisce Curran, è focalizzare su altre qualità della propria personalità (diligenza, flessibilità, perseveranza) piuttosto che guardare alla perfezione come una dimensione monodimensionale. In generale occorrerebbe insomma spostare l'attenzione sui propri traguardi e sui propri desideri, non impostarli o stabilirli in base a quelli degli altri.
    http://www.repubblica.it/tecnologia/s...dio_accusa_facebook_co-185853568/?rss
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  6. Facebook has faced many challenges in 2017, and Zuckerberg wants to acknowledge that the message has been received.

    Many believe that the social network hasn’t done enough to block fake news and Russian interference in the 2016 U.S. election. Terrorists take advantage of online platforms to recruit new terrorists. Online abuse has never been so bad. And people are realizing that mindlessly browsing a newsfeed is a pure waste of time.

    “The world feels anxious and divided, and Facebook has a lot of work to do — whether it’s protecting our community from abuse and hate, defending against interference by nation states, or making sure that time spent on Facebook is time well spent,” Zuckerberg wrote. “My personal challenge for 2018 is to focus on fixing these important issues. We won’t prevent all mistakes or abuse, but we currently make too many errors enforcing our policies and preventing misuse of our tools. If we’re successful this year then we’ll end 2018 on a much better trajectory.”

    Zuckerberg has an important responsibility as he’s at the helm of a centralized platform that has become the cornerstone of public opinion. Articles become viral and algorithms encourage outrage. In his statement, he also says that people have lost faith in centralized platforms and big communities.

    And this is key to understanding Zuckerberg’s statement. This isn’t about making the world a better place. First, Zuckerberg wants to foster trust to drive growth and make people love Facebook again. Second, Facebook wants to prove that it can regulate itself. The company doesn’t want to deal with new regulation, antitrust committee and Senate investigations.

    If only Zuckerberg realized all of that earlier… But don’t worry, now he’s on it! I’m sure Zuckerberg will still find ways to have fun — he just won’t brag about it publicly on Facebook.

    Every year I take on a personal challenge to learn something new. I’ve visited every US state, run 365 miles, built an AI for my home, read 25 books, and learned Mandarin.

    I started doing these challenges in 2009. That first year the economy was in a deep recession and Facebook was not yet profitable. We needed to get serious about making sure Facebook had a sustainable business model. It was a serious year, and I wore a tie every day as a reminder.

    Today feels a lot like that first year. The world feels anxious and divided, and Facebook has a lot of work to do — whether it’s protecting our community from abuse and hate, defending against interference by nation states, or making sure that time spent on Facebook is time well spent.
    https://techcrunch.com/2018/01/04/mar...hallenge-is-all-about-fixing-facebook
    Tags: , , , by M. Fioretti (2018-01-04)
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  7. this article analyses Google’s two main advertising systems, AdWords and AdSense, and proposes that these financial models have significant effects upon online discourse. In discussing AdWords, this article details some of the tensions between the local and the global that develop when tracing flows of information and capital, specifically highlighting Google’s impact on the decline of online language diversity. In outlining AdSense, this article demonstrates how Google’s hegemonic control prescribes which parts of the web can be monetised and which remain unprofitable. In particular, in drawing from existing studies, evidence is provided that Google’s AdSense programme, along with Google’s relationship with Facebook, incentivised the rise of fake news in the 2016 US presidential election. This work builds on existing scholarship to demonstrate that Google’s economic influence has varied and far-reaching effects in a number of contexts and is relevant to scholars in a range of disciplines. As such, this article is intended as a discursive introduction to the topic and does not require specific disciplinary background knowledge. In doing so, this article does not attempt to provide the final word on Google’s relationship to digital capitalism, but rather, demonstrate the profitability of a Post-Fordist perspective, in order to enable a wider engagement with the issues identified.
    https://www.nature.com/articles/s41599-017-0021-4
    Tags: , , , by M. Fioretti (2018-01-02)
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  8. Be smart: We can't say it too often: The real problem with fake news is that people don't believe real news. That's terrible for society and democracy, making good decisions less likely.
    https://www.axios.com/the-trump-cry-heard-round-the-world-2520976693.html
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  9. the U.S. Government – meaning, at the moment, the Trump administration – has the unilateral and unchecked power to force the removal of anyone it wants from Facebook and Instagram by simply including them on a sanctions list. Does anyone think this is a good outcome? Does anyone trust the Trump administration, or any other government, to compel social media platforms to delete and block anyone it wants to be silenced? As the ACLU’s Jennifer Granick told the Times:
    https://theintercept.com/2017/12/30/f...on-of-the-u-s-and-israeli-governments
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  10. Parker described how in the early days of Facebook people would tell him they weren’t on social media because they valued their real-life interactions.

    “And I would say, ‘OK. You know, you will be,’” he said.

    “I don’t know if I really understood the consequences of what I was saying,” he added, pointing to “unintended consequences” that arise when a network grows to have more than 2 billion users.

    “It literally changes your relationship with society, with each other. It probably interferes with productivity in weird ways. God only knows what it’s doing to our children’s brains,” he said.

    He explained that when Facebook was being developed the objective was: “How do we consume as much of your time and conscious attention as possible?” It was this mindset that led to the creation of features such as the “like” button that would give users “a little dopamine hit” to encourage them to upload more content.

    “It’s a social-validation feedback loop … exactly the kind of thing that a hacker like myself would come up with, because you’re exploiting a vulnerability in human psychology.”
    https://www.theguardian.com/technolog...parker-vulnerability-brain-psychology
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