mfioretti: privacy*

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  1. What is public shame going to look like in 2033
    http://www.antipope.org/charlie/blog-...8/the-internet-is-for-porn-black.html
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  2. Netscape Communications Corporation's release of Communicator 4.06 * » contains a new feature, ``Smart Browsing'', controlled by a new icon labeled What's Related , a front-end to a service that will recommend sites that are related to the document the user is currently viewing. The implementation of this feature raises a number of potentially serious privacy concerns, which we have examined here.

    Specifically, URLs that are visited while a user browses the web are reported back to a server at Netscape. The logs of this data, when used in conjunction with cookies, could be used to build extensive dossiers of individual web users, even including their names, addresses, and telephone numbers in some cases.
    http://www.interhack.net/pubs/whatsrelated
    Tags: , , by M. Fioretti (2012-08-04)
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  3. Di conseguenza, i gestori dei siti che vogliano continuare a usare questo servizio, dovranno implementare l’informativa breve (il caratteristico banner) e registrare il consenso dell’utente. Coloro che, invece, continuino ad utilizzare il servizio di Google nelle sue modalità di default o lo colleghino addirittura ad altri servizi (come ad esempio Google Adsense) dovranno procedere anche a notificare il trattamento al Garante (pagando un importo di 150 euro).
    http://www.chefuturo.it/2015/06/guida...elaw-garante-banner-analytics-cookies
    Tags: , , by M. Fioretti (2015-06-08)
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  4. The Riksbank governor, Stefan Ingves, called for new legislation to secure public control over the payments system, arguing that being able to make and receive payments is a “collective good” like defence, the courts, or public statistics.
    Cashing out? Why notes and coins may become a thing of the past in Sweden
    Read more

    “Most citizens would feel uncomfortable to surrender these social functions to private companies,” he said.

    “It should be obvious that Sweden’s preparedness would be weakened if, in a serious crisis or war, we had not decided in advance how households and companies would pay for fuel, supplies and other necessities.”


    “When you have a fully digital system you have no weapon to defend yourself if someone turns it off,” he says.

    “If Putin invades Gotland Sweden’s largest island » it will be enough for him to turn off the payments system. No other country would even think about taking these sorts of risks, they would demand some sort of analogue system.”


    an opinion poll this month revealed unease among Swedes, with almost seven out of 10 saying they wanted to keep the option to use cash, while just 25% wanted a completely cashless society. MPs from left and right expressed concerns at a recent parliamentary hearing. Parliament is conducting a cross-party review of central bank legislation that will also investigate the issues surrounding cash.
    'I don't use contactless': the woman whose name is on British banknotes
    Read more

    The Pirate Party – which made its name in Sweden for its opposition to state and private sector surveillance – welcomes a higher political profile for these issues.
    Look at Ireland, Christian Engström says, where abortion is illegal. It is much easier for authorities to identify Irish women who have had an abortion if the state can track all digital financial transactions, he says. And while Sweden’s government might be relatively benign, a quick look at Europe suggests there is no guarantee how things might develop in the future.
    https://www.theguardian.com/world/201...tack-swedes-turn-against-cashlessness
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  5. Stratumseind in Eindhoven is one of the busiest nightlife streets in the Netherlands. On a Saturday night, bars are packed, music blares through the street, laughter and drunken shouting bounces off the walls. As the night progresses, the ground becomes littered with empty shot bottles, energy drink cans, cigarette butts and broken glass.

    It’s no surprise that the place is also known for its frequent fights. To change that image, Stratumseind has become one of the “smartest” streets in the Netherlands. Lamp-posts have been fitted with wifi-trackers, cameras and 64 microphones that can detect aggressive behaviour and alert police officers to altercations. There has been a failed experiment to change light intensity to alter the mood. The next plan, starting this spring, is to diffuse the smell of oranges to calm people down. The aim? To make Stratumseind a safer place.

    We get that comment a lot – ‘Big brother is watching you’. I prefer to say, ‘Big brother is helping you’
    Peter van de Crommert

    All the while, data is being collected and stored. “Visitors do not realise they are entering a living laboratory,” says Maša Galic, a researcher on privacy in the public space for the Tilburg Institute of Law, Technology and Society. Since the data on Stratumseind is used to profile, nudge or actively target people, this “smart city” experiment is subject to privacy law. According to the Dutch Personal Data Protection Act, people should be notified in advance of data collection and the purpose should be specified – but in Stratumseind, as in many other “smart cities”, this is not the case.

    Peter van de Crommert is involved at Stratumseind as project manager with the Dutch Institute for Technology, Safety and Security. He says visitors do not have to worry about their privacy: the data is about crowds, not individuals. “We often get that comment – ‘Big brother is watching you’ – but I prefer to say, ‘Big brother is helping you’. We want safe nightlife, but not a soldier on every street corner.”
    Revellers in Eindhoven’s Stratumseind celebrate King’s Day.
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    Revellers in Eindhoven’s Stratumseind celebrate King’s Day. Photograph: Filippo Manaresi/Moment Editorial/Getty Images

    When we think of smart cities, we usually think of big projects: Songdo in South Korea, the IBM control centre in Rio de Janeiro or the hundreds of new smart cities in India. More recent developments include Toronto, where Google will build an entirely new smart neighbourhood, and Arizona, where Bill Gates plans to build his own smart city. But the reality of the smart city is that it has stretched into the everyday fabric of urban life – particularly so in the Netherlands.
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    In the eastern city of Enschede, city traffic sensors pick up your phone’s wifi signal even if you are not connected to the wifi network. The trackers register your MAC address, the unique network card number in a smartphone. The city council wants to know how often people visit Enschede, and what their routes and preferred spots are. Dave Borghuis, an Enschede resident, was not impressed and filed an official complaint. “I don’t think it’s okay for the municipality to track its citizens in this way,” he said. “If you walk around the city, you have to be able to imagine yourself unwatched.”

    Enschede is enthusiastic about the advantages of the smart city. The municipality says it is saving €36m in infrastructure investments by launching a smart traffic app that rewards people for good behaviour like cycling, walking and using public transport. (Ironically, one of the rewards is a free day of private parking.) Only those who mine the small print will discover that the app creates “personal mobility profiles”, and that the collected personal data belongs to the company Mobidot.
    https://www.theguardian.com/cities/20...-privacy-eindhoven-utrecht?CMP=twt_gu
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  6. A study released this week revealed that 47% of Facebook users have swear words on their pages. A survey last week, meanwhile, showed that undergraduate men who talk about alcohol on Facebook tend to have more friends.
    http://edition.cnn.com/2011/TECH/soci...on_technology+%28RSS%3A+Technology%29
    Voting 0
  7. This post is for you, guy with no iPad password, and for you, girl who stays signed into Gmail on her boyfriend’s computer, and for you, person walking down the street having a loud conversation on your mobile phone about your recent doctor’s diagnosis of that rash thing you have. These are the really, really simple things you should be doing to keep casual intruders from invading your privacy.
    http://www.forbes.com/sites/kashmirhi...ould-be-doing-to-protect-your-privacy
    Voting 0
  8. TrueCrypt, tra le altre funzioni, permette anche di creare volumi nascosti, contenitori protetti che possono essere mimetizzati tra gli altri file presenti nel sistema. Quello che però molti utenti di TrueCrypt ignorano è che questi file non sono poi così nascosti: l’utility Tchunt dimostra che è possibile identificare questi volumi con una precisione quasi assoluta
    http://16s.us/TCHunt/index.php
    Voting 0
  9. Personal genetics company 23andMe bought a patient social networking site called CureTogether, an online forum with some 25,000 members who share information about their illness, and personal anecdotes about the effects of treatments and lifestyle choices on their symptoms.
    http://www.technologyreview.com/view/...me-expands-its-data-mining-operations
    Voting 0
  10. Cell phone users face an increasing frequency and depth of privacy intruding attacks. Defense knowledge has not scaled at the same speed as attack capabilities.
    http://events.ccc.de/congress/2011/Fahrplan/events/4736.en.html
    Tags: , , , by M. Fioretti (2011-12-29)
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