Tags: water management*

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  1. The company’s operation in Michigan reveals how it’s dominated the industry by going into economically depressed areas with lax water laws.
    https://www.bloomberg.com/news/featur...ling-water-it-pays-nearly-nothing-for
    Tags: , , by M. Fioretti (2018-04-10)
    Voting 0
  2. As is so often the case, nature does things better than humans, so startup AquaRoot Technologies took a look at the natural networks of tree roots in order to come up with a new way of laying pipes. The Irish company was founded by Vincent Farrelly, who has worked in life sciences and biotechnology for two decades. The idea is that by using a form of 3D printing, pipes can be produced directly on site and customized in any way the farmer chooses.

    The pipes are 3D printed from a polymer foam that expands to 50 times its size when exposed to air and forms a honeycomb structure through which water flows like a sponge.

    “You can also create a bore in the pipe into which you can flow fluid or water through,” Farrelly said. “This forms near instantaneously, and within seconds you’ve got a structure.”

    Vincent Farrelly

    The spongelike structure of the pipes pulls water out of the soil and transports it to plants. According to Farrelly, the pipes can be 3D printed on concrete, asphalt or soil, or injected directly into the soil to form an underground network. Water can be transported using capillary pressure or a suction pump. Farmers can even plant seeds directly in the pipes.

    Farrelly worked with Athlone Institute of Technology to develop the polymer material, and there are now two different formulations – biodegradable, which can be absorbed into the soil, and non-biodegradable, for more permanent structures. Not only are the pipes easier to install, they’re more eco-friendly and efficient, a benefit especially for drought-prone areas.
    https://3dprint.com/196110/3d-printed-pipes-tree-roots
    Voting 0
  3. Bangalore has a problem: It is running out of water, fast. Cities all over the world, from those in the American West to nearly every major Indian metropolis, have been struggling with drought and water deficits in recent years. But Banga­lore is an extreme case. Last summer, a professor from the Indian Institute of Science declared that the city will be unlivable by 2020. He later backed off his prediction of the exact time of death—but even so, says P. N. Ravindra, an official at the Bangalore Water Supply and Sewerage Board, “the projections are relatively correct. Our groundwater levels are approaching zero.”

    Bangalore, once famous for its hundreds of lakes, now has only 81. The rest have been filled and paved over.

    Every year since 2012, Bangalore has been hit by drought; last year Karnataka, of which Bangalore is the capital, received its lowest rainfall level in four decades. But the changing climate is not exclusively to blame for Bangalore’s water problems. The city’s growth, hustled along by its tech sector, made it ripe for crisis. Echoing urban patterns around the world, Bangalore’s population nearly doubled from 5.7 million in 2001 to 10.5 million today. By 2020 more than 2 million IT professionals are expected to live here.

    Through the 2000s, Bangalore’s urban landscape expanded so quickly that the city had no time to extend its subcutaneous network of water pipes into the fastest-growing areas, like Whitefield. Layers of concrete and tarmac crept out across the city, stopping water from seeping into the ground. Bangalore, once famous for its hundreds of lakes, now has only 81. The rest have been filled and paved over. Of the 81 remaining, more than half are contaminated with sewage.
    https://www.wired.com/2017/05/why-ban...everyones-crisis/?mbid=social_twitter
    Voting 0
  4. Showers are great, but pouring hot and almost drinkable water down the drain is not. Besides the obvious costs to the environment and your bills, there is also a conscious on unconscious psychological cost anytime you create waste.

    To solve this problem we created Showerloop. It's a shower that collects cleans and reuses the water in real time while you are showering. So now you can shower for as long as you like without wasting precious resources.
    https://www.wevolver.com/wevolver.mod...ource=twitter.com&utm_campaign=buffer
    Voting 0
  5. Beijing sits in a dry plain where groundwater has accumulated over millennia. As wells are drilled and the water table drops, the underlying soil compacts, much like a dried-out sponge.

    The study finds that the entire city is sinking but the subsidence is most pronounced in Beijing’s Chaoyang district, which has boomed since 1990 with skyscrapers, ringroads and other development. The researchers say the uneven nature of the subsidence in some areas poses risks to buildings and other infrastructure.

    Tens of thousands of water wells are thought to exist in and around Beijing, many of them used in farming and landscaping. The state has regulatory power over installation of wells but is inconsistent in applying it, according to one leading Chinese environmentalist.

    “There are some rules but the enforcement is doubtful,” said Ma Jun, director of the Institute of Public and Environmental Affairs in Beijing. Ma said he wasn’t surprised subsidence was relatively high in the Chaoyang district given its rapid growth of recent decades. He expected it to keep moving east as the city sprawled in that direction.

    In 2015 China inaugurated a mega-engineering project aimed at mitigating Beijing’s water crisis. The state completed construction of the South-North Water Diversion, a £48bn, 2,400km network of canals and tunnels, designed to divert 44.8bn cubic metres of water to the capital.
    https://www.theguardian.com/world/201...-by-11cm-a-year-satellite-study-warns
    Voting 0
  6. we finally got something that the bay has been missing for generations, which is public will for the cleaning.

    “Nobody wants to have guests at their house and show a dirty house. So if we’re not able to reach the target, we need to keep working until the last minute and make sure that the athletes can compete in safe waters, and we’ve been doing this.”

    That’s not a very encouraging statement, doubly so considering that independent testing done by the Associated Press suggested that the presence of viral pathogens in the water was a problem the IOC was failing to address.
    http://deadspin.com/rio-has-given-up-...to-clean-up-the-water-in-t-1759894974
    Voting 0
  7. News of the poisoned water crisis in Flint has reached a wide audience around the world. The basics are now known: the Republican governor, Rick Snyder, nullified the free elections in Flint, deposed the mayor and city council, then appointed his own man to run the city. To save money, they decided to unhook the people of Flint from their fresh water drinking source, Lake Huron, and instead, make the public drink from the toxic Flint River.
    http://ecowatch.com/2016/01/30/michael-moore-flint
    Voting 0
  8. The energy production industry is the second-largest consumer of water in the world after agriculture, according to Xylem Inc., which makes equipment for the water industry. It estimates that some processes in OPEC nations such as secondary oil recovery use about 30 times more of the liquid to extract their crude than producers outside the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries.

    The Middle East has some of the world’s lowest levels of water supplies that aren’t replenished by rains. A significant amount of the region’s fresh water is made from the sea pumped through desalination plants, ranging from 27 percent in Oman to 87 percent in Qatar, according to a report on Wednesday by Irena. Removing the salt burns through a third of total power consumed in the United Arab Emirates and Qatar, the report said. Saudi Arabia uses a 10th of its domestic oil to power its desalination plants.
    http://www.bloomberg.com/news/article...s-to-renewables-to-avert-water-crisis
    Voting 0
  9. the goal of providing farmers with a large scale produce infrastructure that requires no sunlight or soil is getting closer every day. While this all sounds pretty out there, consider the possibilities: plants grown in a controlled environment, effectively sealed from contaminants that frequently pervade crops from both the air and the ground, would be 100 percent organic and pesticide-free. The LED system is customizable, too, allowing settings for each individual plant to be controlled and adapted as needed. You can't say that about Mother Nature. Currently Phillips is focusing on perfecting those light growth recipes for strawberries, leafy green veggies, and herbs, with potatoes and wheat in the pipeline.

    In a press release, Philips Global Director of City Farming, Gus van der Feltz, defined GrowWise City's goals as lofty but potentially world changing: "Our aim is to develop the technology that makes it possible to grow tasty, healthy and sustainable food virtually anywhere. The research we are undertaking will enable local food production on a global scale, reducing waste, limiting food miles and using practically no land or water." If Philips can actually pull off these LED Light Growth Recipes and create accessible technology to grow veggies year round in cities that don't have access to unpolluted farmland, we will be living in a world that our farming forefathers could not have imagined. It will be a better world, with fresh food, even if adjusting to the idea of high tech cornfields is a bit of a mind-bender.

    Meanwhile in Japan, lettuce has gone wild. GE designed LED lights are now powering indoor farming facilities that are growing 10,000 leafy green heads a day.

    If that seems like a freakishly high output, it is: the potential for LED farms is not just in their pesticide-free controlled environment, but also in their ability to speed up the life cycle of a plant, effectively altering the day and night pattern than has governed agriculture for millennia. Shimamura boasts of his farm growing lettuce full of vitamins and minerals two-and-a-half times faster than an outdoor farm, while also cutting down discarded produce waste from a regular farm's 50 percent to just 10 percent. The farm also uses just 1 percent of the water used by outdoor farms. These are some pretty efficient salads.
    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/peter-g...ms-of-the-future-forge_b_7875938.html
    Voting 0
  10. Esplora il significato del termine: Un orto «a centrimetri zero», un orto «verticale, biologico, che funziona come un elettrodomestico, nutre nebulizzando semi e radici risparmiando il 90 per cento dell’acqua rispetto a una coltivazione tradizionale». Dal green hub di Progetto Manifattura, a Rovereto, Matteo Sansoni ha mostrato a Expo il suo gioiellino, nella lounge del ministero delle politiche agricole, all’interno del padiglione Italia. È sua la prima start up dedicata alla realizzazione di orti verticali aeroponici, dove le radici degli ortaggi e delle verdure crescono risultando quasi sospese nell’aria. » Un orto «a centrimetri zero», un orto «verticale, biologico, che funziona come un elettrodomestico, nutre nebulizzando semi e radici risparmiando il 90 per cento dell’acqua rispetto a una coltivazione tradizionale». Dal green hub di Progetto Manifattura, a Rovereto, Matteo Sansoni ha mostrato a Expo il suo gioiellino, nella lounge del ministero delle politiche agricole, all’interno del padiglione Italia. È sua la prima start up dedicata alla realizzazione di orti verticali aeroponici, dove le radici degli ortaggi e delle verdure crescono risultando quasi sospese nell’aria.
    http://corriereinnovazione.corriere.i...996-2df9-11e5-804a-3dc4941ce2e9.shtml
    Voting 0

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