mfioretti: public domain*

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  1. report from the Library of Congress's National Film Preservation Board called The Survival of American Silent Feature Films: 1912–1929 PDF » paints a dismal picture of the archival record of silent movies. In all, "14% of the 10,919 silent films released by major studios exist in their original 35mm or other format," although some of the missing items are extant in lesser transfers and foreign editions. But in all, "we have lost 75% of the creative record from the era that brought American movies to the pinnacle of world cinematic achievement in the 20th century."

    It's a sobering reminder of the fragility of even relatively recent media, and the need for preservation. An appreciable slice of the missing archival materials are still in copyright, with attending difficulties in clearing them for the purpose of striking and circulating new prints.
    http://boingboing.net/2013/12/05/75-o...utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=twitter
    Voting 0
  2. In 2008, the British Library, in partnership with Microsoft, embarked on a project to digitize thousands of out-of-copyright books from the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries. Included within those books were maps, diagrams, illustrations, photographs, and more. The Library has uploaded more than a million of them onto Flickr and released them into the public domain. It's now asking for help.

    Though the library knows which book each image is taken from, its knowledge largely ends there. While some images have useful titles, many do not, so the majority of the million picture collection is uncatalogued, its subject matter unknown.

    Next year, it plans to launch a crowdsourced application to fill the gap, to enable humans to describe the images. This information will then be used to train an automated classifier that will be run against the entire corpus.
    http://arstechnica.com/information-te...ickr-asks-for-help-making-them-useful
    Voting 0
  3. n Enclosing the public domain: The restriction of public domain books in a digital environment, a paper in First Monday, researchers from the Victoria University of Wellington document the widespread proactice of putting restrictions on scanned copies of public domain books online.

    They sampled repositories like Google Books, Project Gutenberg, and the Internet Archive, and found about half the public domain books in their sample had some kind of conditions or restrictions on their use, due to uncertainty about whether the books were in the public domain. However, they showed that they could typically determine public domain status in about a minute, and say that the repositories should be following suit.
    https://medium.com/@xor/houston-we-ha...-a-public-domain-problem-bd971c57dfdc
    Tags: , , by M. Fioretti (2014-07-01)
    Voting 0
  4. The Authors Guild -- notorious for advancing extremely broad, censorious theories of copyright -- told Lee that the Guild "does not support extending the copyright term, especially since many of our members benefit from having access to a thriving and substantial public domain of older works,If anything, we would likely support a rollback to a term of life-plus-50 if it were politically feasible." It will be very difficult to sell term extension as a measure to benefit artists if prominent artists' groups are speaking out against it.

    The other factor is that Congress is a total shambles, its calendar dominated by shutdowns and chaotic attempts to ram through the extreme agenda of the GOP electoral majority that represents a numeric minority of Americans, and the chances of any laws getting passed are slim.

    But there's always the possibility that copyright term extension would be slipped into must-pass legislation, a budget or a key appropriation. That's a risky game, given the possibility that this would spark a public uprising to kill it (there's plenty of Conservative animus for the entertainment industry, after all, and the 1998 term extension was counted as a major achievement by Bill Clinton and his acolytes, so this could be painted as greedy, corporate-money-fattened Republicans helping to preserve the hated legacy of the Clintons).
    https://boingboing.net/2018/01/08/sonny-bono-is-dead.html
    Voting 0
  5. -
    http://www.techdirt.com/articles/2011...retroactively-extends-copyright.shtml
    Voting 0
  6. Googlebooks has scanned tons of PUBLIC DOMAIN BOOKS, but not all PUBLIC DOMAIN BOOKS are accessible. There are a tons of PUBLIC DOMAIN BOOKS that Goglebooks refuses to UNLOCK for full view. It is terribly important to know that scanning is not preservation and does not mean access. Besides, will Google care enough to make multiple scanned copies available? Will we be able to see the errors and additions in certain volumes or not once the originals disappear?
    http://www.digital-rights.net/?p=3733
    Voting 0
  7. data, not software, is the heart of today's most successful "software" companies. Peddling bits is yesterday's business model.

    But what about innovation? If developers choose to put their code into the public domain, won't innovation stagnate?

    Please. That's another tired argument from the 20th Century. TechDirt highlights research showing that extending copyrights increases prices and limits dissemination of knowledge, while also pointing out that people who believe patents cause innovation are simply confusing correlation with causation. If anything, patents inhibit innovation.

    This may be one reason that the US and UK, both super strong on intellectual property protection, come in dead last in IT innovation, according to a new report from CA Technologies.

    None of which means that developers or companies need rip off their clothes and mosh to hippie anthems, all while collectively shaking their fists at The Man. It just means that we should start considering public domain as a more efficient way to share code and boost innovation. To the extent that companies feel the need to hold code back under proprietary licenses as a way to encourage customers to pay, fine. But real innovation should happen in the open, and the most open way to do this is the public domain.
    http://www.theregister.co.uk/2013/02/18/open_and_shut
    Voting 0
  8. One of the most exciting things about widespread access to 3D printing is how it has started to push cultural institutions to begin digitizing their 3D collections. Now, in addition to being able to see free high quality 2D scans of paintings like a 15th Century Italian Pentecost and 18th Century Japanese Woodcuts, you can see (and sometimes download, print, and modify) high quality 3D scans of the Cooper Hewitt Mansion, Abraham Lincoln’s face, and Musette the Maltese Dog. With objects reaching back thousands of years scattered across cultural institutions around the world, it isn’t hard to imagine a future where the world’s cultural heritage objects are available to anyone with a 3D printer (or, say, a Shapeways account).

    a question about copyright is lurking in the background of this glorious future. Specifically, a question about copyrights in the scans of the objects themselves: are 3D scans protected by copyright? If the answer is yes, scanning could drag parts of cultural heritage objects away from their home in the public domain and lock them up behind proprietary walls for decades. That would make it much harder for people to access their own cultural heritage.

    Fortunately, at least one court in the United States has found that scanning an object does not create a new copyright in the scan. That means that scanning a 9th century Hanuman mask doesn’t wrap the scan in a new copyright. However, a paper from earlier this year by Thomas Margoni illustrates that the copyright status of scans is not as clear in the European Union. That lack of clarity alone could slow the dissemination of objects housed in Europe’s finest cultural institutions. Hopefully, the EU will move to clarify that 3D scans of objects do not create entirely new layers of copyright protection.
    http://www.shapeways.com/blog/archive...blic-domain-in-the-public-domain.html
    Voting 0
  9. Sadly, this looks less likely to come to fruition thanks to opposition from collecting societies, who seem to think they have a right to payments even from libraries trying to do their job by helping the public gain access to information. Argentina's archaic copyright system may be very different, but its collecting societies are clearly no different from those in other countries.
    https://www.techdirt.com/articles/201...yright-works-with-mixed-results.shtml
    Voting 0
  10. With a wide-open, long tail platform, the Amazon bans junk ebooks is going to be very tough to enforce, but they’re right. Having someone selling 10,000 books each computer generated and each based on Wikipedia content wasn’t good for anyone.
    http://www.thedominoproject.com/2012/05/amazon-bans-junk-ebooks.html
    Tags: , , , , by M. Fioretti (2012-07-10)
    Voting 0

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