mfioretti: millennials*

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  1. Young Americans no longer use Facebook

    The over 55 crowd are lining up to go to Facebook, which means its the death bell for Facebook ever remaining relevant to advertizers as its usage will decrease YOY in pretty large amounts here in North America. There’s no point in targeting users on the advertising platform if they don’t even sign in, right?

    Facebook is thus built on a big lie, that’s it’s actually still relevant.

    “Facebook is for old people” is a mantra that invariably is only going to get worse as the Newsfeed becomes irrelevant there for brands and marketers.

    Even back in 2015, only 14% Of teens said Facebook was the most important social network.

    What’s more, usage among 18–24 year-olds is predicted to fall, as well, by 5.8%.

    It really does not matter how many “users” Facebook has globally, the penetration among key demographics in North America is what really matters. If Twitter is an actual barometer on real-time events and collective sentiment, Facebook is that place you go to meet your grandmother who lives in another country.

    With actual peer circles and with streaks, Snapchat is a much more persuasive app for teens than Instagram, that is better known for celebrities.
    Over 55s flock to Facebook as teenagers leave in droves for Snapchat

    With consumers more careful of smartphone addiction and notification spam and algorithms in feeds manipulating us, 2018 might be the year consumers kill Facebook. Facebook pivoting away from the Newsfeed is an ugly sign that the era of “likes” and personal sharing is nearly dead.

    Have you considered a digital detox from social media apps in 2018?
    https://medium.com/@Michael_Spencer/t...xodus-of-youth-continues-db8c146cb5ca
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  2. An ‘awakening’ is happening inside workplaces. The youngest generations are just much less accepting of the extremely poor quality internal systems that their older colleagues were forced to use. There is almost an internal revolt against horrible systems; they’re simply not willing to accept the low quality tools that have been delivered by the organisation in the past.

    In some instances, IT strategy is just ignored and people just find their own tools – often cloud services and mobile apps. If IT and management do not rise to the challenge, they are going to find themselves redundant.

    A while back, we had the bring your own device (BYOD). Now we have bring your own technology and software – bring your own everything. So, what’s the purpose of managers if employees have to find the right tools to allow them to collaborate efficiently? What is the future of the IT department if they don’t own or support cloud services?

    The trend is continuing: employees are designing their own digital environment, influencing their colleagues’ ways of working, and bypassing traditional management.
    http://www.marginalia.online/building...o-achieve-true-digital-transformation
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  3. Le ragioni sono molte. Uno dei punti messi sul tappeto ruota proprio intorno ai social network come Facebook e Instagram. Queste piattaforme hanno reso molto semplice confrontarsi con altre persone e soprattutto innescato una sorta di competizione sbilanciata e reciproca, basata su ciò che vediamo sulle bacheche che, come noto, non sempre rispecchia esattamente la vita reale. Piuttosto, l'immagine che gli "amici" intendono dare di se stessi, spesso lavorandoci in profondità. La tendenza alla competizione non è certo prerogativa delle piattaforma ma è innata all'essere umano già in età prescolare. Il problema, semmai, è che - come hanno denunciato molti ex manager delle piattaforme poi sganciati dalle loro creature - quei social sfruttano le debolezze psicologiche per innescare anche queste forme di atteggiamenti e reazioni.

    I Millennials hanno dunque a disposizione un'enorme quantità di "metriche" per giudicare la propria esistenza. Senz'altro molte di più dei loro genitori. Like, follower e "amici" sono una di queste. Difficile capire come se ne possa uscire o almeno provare a fare un passo indietro da questo circolo vizioso. Il primo passo, suggerisce Curran, è focalizzare su altre qualità della propria personalità (diligenza, flessibilità, perseveranza) piuttosto che guardare alla perfezione come una dimensione monodimensionale. In generale occorrerebbe insomma spostare l'attenzione sui propri traguardi e sui propri desideri, non impostarli o stabilirli in base a quelli degli altri.
    http://www.repubblica.it/tecnologia/s...dio_accusa_facebook_co-185853568/?rss
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  4. According to a new survey from Credible, a personal finance website, 50 percent of all respondents (ages 18-34) said they would give up their right to vote during the next two presidential elections in order to never have to make another loan payment again.

    Other extremes include a willingness to ditch ride-sharing services like Uber or Lyft (44 percent) and giving up travel outside of the country for five years (42 percent) to have student loans forgiven.

    Yet, only 27 percent said they would be willing to move in with their parents for five years or give up texting at 13 percent. Of the 500 millennials surveyed, only 8.2 percent of them chose to keep paying off their debt and not give up anything.

    The survey comes just as The Associated Press reports that tens of thousands of former students have been left in limbo as the Trump administration has delayed action on requests for loan forgiveness, according to court documents. The report says The Education Department is sitting on more than 65,000 unapproved claims as it rewrites Obama-era rules that sought to better protect students.

    During his campaign, Trump proposed student loan forgiveness after 15 years of repayment. However, since taking office, Trump and Secretary of Education Betsy Devos’ initial education budget have sought to eliminate current loan forgiveness programs.

    In July, Fox Business reported on a similar survey from MoneyTips.com that found that nearly 42 percent of Americans think President Trump’s administration should forgive all federal student debt in order to help stimulate the economy.

    Michael Dubrow, co-founder of MoneyTips, told Fox Business that while the survey didn’t specifically focus on millennials (ages 18-29) a majority of them were “especially passionate” about it, nearly twice as much as those 50 and older.

    “Even if older people are still paying off their loans, younger people paid more and borrowed more for higher education,” Dubrow said in an interview in July.
    http://nypost.com/2017/09/14/half-of-...ve-up-their-rights-to-get-out-of-debt
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  5. f there is any indication of the cultural import and effect of the “millennials” – a term I dislike for reasons I will explain later – look no further than America’s malls. The Baby Boomer hubris and NIMBYism that sent malls into further and further orbits from city centers has come home to roost and it promises to change the face of retail in a big way.

    First, some statistics. I point to Columbus, Ohio because it’s where I’m from and I have plenty of data points. First, Sears is pulling out of two of Columbus’ once-mighty malls, Eastland and Westland. These “directional malls,” built between 1964 and 1969, were once the jewels of the city. Far enough from downtown commerce they let suburbanites stock up at any of their many anchor stores – J.C.Penney, Sears, K-Mart – and then eat at a fast casual spot like Red Lobster and, later, Outback. This self-contained world further became the locus for youth culture in the suburbs – a place to hang out that wasn’t outside – and, ultimately, became a symbol of a failed way of life.

    These mall suburbs are now magnets for the poor. Two forces are at work here. First, young people are moving back into the city center resulting in a rise in housing prices and the closure of many rent-stabilized buildings in the once-moribund Downtown area. Further, subsidized housing has ground in districts around – you guessed it – the old malls.

    From the Dispatch:

    Seven of the 16 ZIP codes within Columbus’ pre-1950 boundaries have lost subsidized households since 1994, according to housing authority data. Meanwhile, 33 of the remaining 35 ZIP codes in Franklin County have gained households using rent vouchers. That includes large gains in the three ZIP codes near Westland Mall (43228), the old Northland Mall site (43229) and Eastland Mall (43232).

    And don’t think fast food is safe. The old slop is rapidly aging, as Bob Dylan once wrote. To wit: the CEO of Buffalo Wild Wings – a chain that started in Columbus, Ohio as Buffalo Wings & Weck (BW3) and, in my gastronomic opinion, has since gone far downhill – said that lack of interest in casual dining joints like BWW and Applebee’s is slowly forcing a further contraction.

    “Casual-dining restaurants face a uniquely challenging market today,” current CEO Sally Smith wrote in a letter to shareholders. “Millennial consumers are more attracted than their elders to cooking at home, ordering delivery from restaurants and eating quickly, in fast-casual or quick-serve restaurants. Mall traffic has slowed. And, surprisingly, television viewership of sporting events (important for us, especially) is down.”

    In short, the rate of store closures is expected to double in 2017, a worrying trend for those who want cheap, bad food in a sterile, marble-clad environment prominently featuring plastic trees.



    Smith blames millennials. I blame Smith. As has been pointed out many times – most recently in Generation of Sociopaths that the demographics, the policies, and the preferences of the Baby Boomers rode a wave of absolute financial success from the nadir of World War II into the golden 1960s. The habits laid down in those years – the desire for cheap, fast food, the screen as babysitter, the penchant to trade the nameless (but often racist) anxiety of the city for a suburban lawn – defined the rise of fast commerce and will define its fall.

    In short, technology has made us not want to go to the mall by bringing everything – from food to clothing to toilet paper – to our homes. But what comes next? Our species will never survive if it sits on the couch all day eating take-out from Seamless, streaming Netflix, and ordering from Amazon. Small town Main Streets have already been gutted by malls and there is little hope that Old Man Jenkins’ Five and Dime is opening back up. So what comes next?
    https://techcrunch.com/2017/06/12/wel...he-softer-side-of-gutted-sears-stores
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  6. Millennials are threatening dozens of industries.

    They don't buy napkins. They won't play golf. They aren't buying homes or cars. And they're not even eating at Buffalo Wild Wings.

    Millennials' financial decisions have been heavily covered by media organizations — something that has infuriated many of the generation, as news that "millennials are killing" another industry has become a common headline.

    "This is just some more millennial-blaming B.S.," one reader wrote in response to a recent Business Insider article with the headline "Millennials are killing chains like Buffalo Wild Wings and Applebee's."
    https://finance.yahoo.com/news/psycho...ennials-killing-dozens-165006423.html
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  7. Esplora il significato del termine: Ogni Paese ha assistito a un forte calo, dovuto alla crisi e al cambiamento degli stereotipi sulla maggiore età. A livello europeo prevale il concetto di condivisione», spiega Angelo Sticchi Damiani, presidente dell’Automobile Club d’Italia, che snocciola dati per lui poco incoraggianti: rispetto al ‘92, nel 2012 le patenti B sono crollate del 39%, quelle A del cinquanta. L’anno scorso hanno preso la licenza di guida 654.335 under 21; dieci anni fa erano 743.799. «L’automobile oggi è solo uno strumento per muoversi, ma per dove? La Rete occupa la maggior parte del tempo dei giovani, il social network sostituisce l’andare al bar o in piazza», interviene l’antropologo Marco Aime. E allora ecco perché il possesso della tecnologia diventa qualcosa di più personale e liberatorio di un’auto. «Ai miei due figli, 22 e 28 anni, una macchina non interessa: prendono quella del padre o del car sharing», spiega Alberto Marinelli, sociologo dei nuovi media. «Per dirla con McLuhan, in un mondo analogico la vettura era legata alla possibilità di spostarsi nello spazio e nel tempo ed era sinonimo di libertà. Oggi questa funzione è riposta nelle tecnologie: smartphone, tablet o computer non mi chiudono in me stesso, al contrario mi aprono allo scambio di esperienze. Mi introducono in un mondo che attraverso loro posso esplorare». » Ogni Paese ha assistito a un forte calo, dovuto alla crisi e al cambiamento degli stereotipi sulla maggiore età. A livello europeo prevale il concetto di condivisione», spiega Angelo Sticchi Damiani, presidente dell’Automobile Club d’Italia, che snocciola dati per lui poco incoraggianti: rispetto al ‘92, nel 2012 le patenti B sono crollate del 39%, quelle A del cinquanta.

    L’anno scorso hanno preso la licenza di guida 654.335 under 21; dieci anni fa erano 743.799. «L’automobile oggi è solo uno strumento per muoversi, ma per dove? La Rete occupa la maggior parte del tempo dei giovani, il social network sostituisce l’andare al bar o in piazza», interviene l’antropologo Marco Aime. E allora ecco perché il possesso della tecnologia diventa qualcosa di più personale e liberatorio di un’auto. «Ai miei due figli, 22 e 28 anni, una macchina non interessa: prendono quella del padre o del car sharing», spiega Alberto Marinelli, sociologo dei nuovi media. «Per dirla con McLuhan, in un mondo analogico la vettura era legata alla possibilità di spostarsi nello spazio e nel tempo ed era sinonimo di libertà. Oggi questa funzione è riposta nelle tecnologie: smartphone, tablet o computer non mi chiudono in me stesso, al contrario mi aprono allo scambio di esperienze. Mi introducono in un mondo che attraverso loro posso esplorare».
    http://www.corriere.it/cronache/15_se...7f8-60ea-11e5-9c25-5a9b04a29dee.shtml
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  8. Working in the south for voting rights, young activists such as Casey Hayden and Mary King had gained sophisticated organising experience and found strong female role models they could respect in the older black women who were such a central part of the civil rights movement. But by the mid-60s, as black nationalism, the student movement and antiwar protests moved to the centre of cultural prominence, white activist women found themselves both unwelcome within black identity politics and demoted within the other movements.

    Charged with making coffee while the male politicos speechified, shouted down and humiliated for daring to bring up the issue of gender inequality during rallies and leftist gatherings, their early calls for sexual equality were seen as trivial, hormonally inspired, and counter-revolutionary. Inspired by the Black Panthers to look to their own oppression, women began to speak up about what came to be known as “personal politics”. But unlike the Panthers, women were told over and over that they had to subordinate their demands to larger causes in the interests of the movement. They found themselves simmering and stewing as boyfriends and husbands defined what was revolutionary, what was worthy, and what was progressive.

    It was both an exhilarating and a frustrating time to be an activist woman. Some, like me, dropped out of the fight for a time. Others became more violently countercultural and joined the Weather Underground. Others still became leaders of the emerging women’s movement. In 2016, however, many activists saw that movement as part of establishment politics and no longer requiring their revolutionary fervour. As one Sanders supporter wrote:
    Everyone loves Bernie Sanders. Except, it seems, the Democratic party
    Trevor Timm
    Trevor Timm
    Read more

    Yes, equal rights for women and minorities are critically important. To consider these ideals progressive, however, seems passé. At this point, it’s more fair to suggest they are traditional. Gender and civil rights and equality may remain under attack from the right, but these ideals are positively engrained in two generations of Americans. Progressive voters, at this stage in our young country’s political history, want to challenge corrupt systems. The prison-industrial complex, the military-industrial complex, the financial-industrial complex, and the other lobbies that control our politicians and our government, for example.

    I’m fairly certain that Sanders himself doesn’t see “equal rights for women and minorities” as so firmly inscribed in our culture as to be “traditional” or “passé”. Nonetheless, Sanders gave Clinton no credit for her longstanding progressivism in these areas, while identifying her with the corruption he was dedicated to cleaning up. Organising against the abuses that he made his signature causes was indeed a worthy progressive agenda. Portraying Clinton as the enemy of systemic change, on the other hand, was not only factually incorrect, but proved politically disastrous in the general election.

    Sanders was the perfect vehicle to revive political passion both among the older left, revitalised by being on the side of “the revolution” again, and a younger generation who had yet to experience the sense of rightness, community, and belief in the possibility of radical change that nourished us in the 60s. Here was this guy who had lived through it all, who looked like a grandfather but spoke like a union organiser, who was making it seem possible again – but in terms that spoke to the present, to their issues. He was fierce, he was uncompromising, and he wasn’t afraid to call out clear enemies, which revolutions always need to rally around. Wall Street. Greed. Big Money. Super PACS. The establishment.
    https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/c...-sanders-and-the-millennial-feminists
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  9. I mean, honestly. Why does this surprise any thinking person? As I’ve told people before: When I was a kid, we had grownups who’d actually lived through times of segregation and open racism, and were thus able to patiently and clearly explain to us dumb kids why segregation and racism were wrong.

    But my Dad, who saw the world of segregation with his own eyes, is nearly 71 years old. I am 41, and Martin Luther King Jr. and “I Have A Dream” and the drama of the Civil Rights movement were already looking a bit creaky and old-fashioned when I was in high school. So what does it look like to current high schoolers?

    Well, the oldest ones were 10 when Barack Obama was elected, and they were exposed to non-ironic fictional portrayals of a black president for years before that. A world where the idea of a black guy being the U.S. president was a staple gag of stand-up comedy is utterly foreign to them.

    So do you know what people who lecture about things like “structural racism,” “microaggressions” and “white privilege” probably sound like to current young high schoolers (at least the white ones)? They sound like wheezy, moralistic old farts, at best. At BEST. And if you’ve ever been a young person, you know how young people view wheezy, moralistic old farts. When these youngsters go off to college and face SJW administrators, they won’t see those administrators as virtuous revolutionaries fighting the good fight. They’ll see them the way 1950s college students saw scowling, Elvis-hating Deans and Dorm Mothers.

    That’s a best-case scenario. At worst, they’ll view the people who constantly call them out for racism or sexism or whateverism as hypocrites. Back in my day, we had teachers who’d piously lecture us Not To Use Drugs, when you just KNEW many of these same teachers, who’d come of age in the anything-goes era of the late-60s and early 70s, had probably spent their youth grooving on every drug they could get their hands on. So I can imagine white high schoolers today thinking, “oh, ‘white privilege’ is bad, huh? But I notice it seemed to work out pretty nice for your generation, and it worked out even better for my grandparents’ generation. But MY generation looks like it’s gonna get screwed. Why should we settle for less?”

    Steve Sailer has repeatedly noted how our popular culture seems wedded to this weird notion that 1965 was about five years ago, so the awfulness of that era ought to be self-evident to everyone — even though the youngest people who can still remember 1965 are now in their late 50s. Frankly, this is unhealthy, and it sends a message to younger generations that is quite the opposite of what the creators probably intend. I’ve spoken to numerous young white people who adored “Mad Men” not because they saw it as a harsh criticism of the past — instead, they saw it as a vision of a lost utopia.

    I’m not the only one who see this. The whole alt-right is calculated precisely to appeal to these natural feelings of generational restlessness. It’s amazing to me that the Left is so blindsided by this. They wrote the freaking rulebook for this stuff; now another generation is copying it. Shouldn’t they have known? Well, they did at one time: In hindsight, the 1992 movie “Bob Roberts” seems like a kind of a very hazy premonition of the alt-right, but I guess it just seemed too silly to take seriously.
    http://www.theamericanconservative.co...ite-nationalism-christian-high-school
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  10. Preteens and teens may appear dazzlingly fluent, flitting among social-media sites, uploading selfies and texting friends. But they’re often clueless about evaluating the accuracy and trustworthiness of what they find.

    Some 82% of middle-schoolers couldn’t distinguish between an ad labeled “sponsored content” and a real news story on a website, according to a Stanford University study of 7,804 students from middle school through college. The study, set for release Tuesday, is the biggest so far on how teens evaluate information they find online. Many students judged the credibility of newsy tweets based on how much detail they contained or whether a large photo was attached, rather than on the source.

    More than two out of three middle-schoolers couldn’t see any valid reason to mistrust a post written by a bank executive arguing that young adults need more financial-planning help. And nearly four in 10 high-school students believed, based on the headline, that a photo of deformed daisies on a photo-sharing site provided strong evidence of toxic conditions near the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant in Japan, even though no source or location was given for the photo.

    Facebook Inc. and Alphabet Inc.’s Google are taking steps to prevent sites that disseminate fake news from using their advertising platforms, and Twitter Inc. is moving to curb harassment by users. But that won’t get rid of false or biased information online, which comes from many sources, including deceptive advertising, satirical websites and misleading partisan posts and articles.
    Evaluating the Credibility of News Sources
    As part of Stanford University’s study of students and online news, it asked middle schoolers which of the four tweets, above, were the most trustworthy. More than half of the 204 students responding trusted Lisa Bloom’s tweet more the one from NPR, noting it had the most information. A sample student response: ‘The best tweet for information is the first one because it actually shows him resigning in a picture, and it gives a caption saying that he is resigning.’ ENLARGE
    As part of Stanford University’s study of students and online news, it asked middle schoolers which of the four tweets, above, were the most trustworthy. More than half of the 204 students responding trusted Lisa Bloom’s tweet more the one from NPR, noting it had the most information. A sample student response: ‘The best tweet for information is the first one because it actually shows him resigning in a picture, and it gives a caption saying that he is resigning.’ Photo: Stanford History Education Group

    A growing number of schools are teaching students to be savvy about choosing and believing various information sources, a skill set educators label “media literacy.”
    http://www.wsj.com/articles/most-stud...-fake-stanford-study-finds-1479752576
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