mfioretti: facebook*

Bookmarks on this page are managed by an admin user.

494 bookmark(s) - Sort by: Date / Title ↑ / Voting / - Bookmarks from other users for this tag

  1. Il gioco di parole nel titolo ha ingannato qualcuno in Italia, non si sa chi per primo: forse Repubblica che ha messo per prima con grande evidenza in homepage il titolo “Facebook sta per spegnere Whatsapp”, forse un’agenzia che poi è stata ripresa da tutti (AGi è andata online con simile titolo poco dopo). Fatto sta che nel giro di pochi minuti, sulle homepage di quasi tutti i siti dei giornali e di news italiani – si segnala per esserne stata alla larga La Stampa – ha cominciato ad apparire la notizia che Facebook avrebbe chiuso Whatsapp, in forma più o meno assertiva: notizia che veniva attribuita all’articolo del Daily Mail, il quale però come sappiamo parlava d’altro.
    http://www.wittgenstein.it/2014/04/17...acebook-chiude-whatsapp-notizia-falsa
    Tags: , , by M. Fioretti (2014-04-19)
    Voting 0
  2. fra tre anni Facebook potrebbe non esistere più o quasi. Uno studio della Princeton University prevede infatti che il club digitale dell’amicizia scompaia dal web entro il 2017: nei prossimi tre anni, afferma la ricerca, potrebbe perdere l’80 per cento o più dei suoi seguaci, come riporta oggi il Guardian di Londra.

    Naturalmente è soltanto un’ipotesi scientifica, basata sulla curva di crescita e decrescita di epidemie come la peste bubbonica. Ma proprio in modo simile a un’epidemia si è diffuso il social network, moltiplicandosi a velocità prodigiosa, da poche migliaia di studenti di Harvard a un milione di utenti a centinaia di milioni e ormai a un sesto dell’umanità. E altri social network, come MySpace e Bebo, sono nati, cresciuti e precipitati nel nulla molto rapidamente:
    http://www.repubblica.it/tecnologia/2..._princeton_social_media-76722167/?rss
    Voting 0
  3. E’ il più grande social network del mondo, ha già più di un miliardo di utenti e continua a diffondersi come un virus inarrestabile. Eppure fra tre anni Facebook potrebbe non esistere più o quasi. Uno studio della Princeton University prevede infatti che il club digitale dell’amicizia scompaia dal web entro il 2017: nei prossimi tre anni, afferma la ricerca, potrebbe perdere l’80 per cento o più dei suoi seguaci, come riporta oggi il Guardian di Londra.

    Naturalmente è soltanto un’ipotesi scientifica, basata sulla curva di crescita e decrescita di epidemie come la peste bubbonica. Ma proprio in modo simile a un’epidemia si è diffuso il social network, moltiplicandosi a velocità prodigiosa, da poche migliaia di studenti di Harvard a un milione di utenti a centinaia di milioni e ormai a un sesto dell’umanità. E altri social network, come MySpace e Bebo, sono nati, cresciuti e precipitati nel nulla molto rapidamente: in teoria non è escluso che possa accadere anche a Facebook, che celebrerà il suo decimo compleanno il 4 febbraio (sì, sembra che sia con noi da sempre, ma è nato appena nel 2004), affermano gli autori della ricerca.
    http://www.repubblica.it/tecnologia/2...dalla_princeton_social_media-76722167
    Tags: by M. Fioretti (2016-03-23)
    Voting 0
  4. «Nominatemi! Ho voglia di golarmi un birrozzo alla goccia!». L’appello di Alessio (i nomi sono tutti di fantasia, ma le storie no) su Facebook verrà presto esaudito e magari non per la prima volta. Scoppia anche a Bologna la moda importata dai paesi anglosassoni della “sfida della nomina”, il gioco rischioso e contagioso del Neknominate, di ingurgitare fino «all’ultima goccia», birra, superalcolici o intrugli vari: chi è “nominato” (Grande Fratello docet) posta sul suo profilo Facebook il video della performance alcolica e un istante dopo “nomina” almeno altri quattro amici e amiche che vengono chiamati a fare altrettanto nelle successive 24 ore, pena la punizione di pagare da bere al “nominante”. Una catena logaritmicamente tendente all’infinito, una sfida fine a se stessa in cui si mostra orgogliosi la propria solitaria esperienza sul web alla comunità degli amici.
    http://bologna.repubblica.it/cronaca/...col_ai_tempi_di_fb-79903995/?ref=fbpr
    Voting 0
  5. In Slovakia, data from Facebook-owned analytics site CrowdTangle shows that “interactions” – engagement such as likes, shares and comments – fell by 60% overnight for the Facebook pages of a broad selection of the country’s media Facebook pages. Filip Struhárik, a Slovakian journalist with news site Denník N, says the situation has since worsened, falling by a further 5%.

    “Lower reach can be a problem for smaller publishers, citizens’ initiatives, small NGOs,” Struhárik said. “They can’t afford to pay for distribution on Facebook by boosting posts – and they don’t have infrastructure to reach people other ways.”

    Struhárik thinks his employer will survive the change. Denník N has subscription revenue, which means it doesn’t rely on the vast traffic that Facebook can drive for advertising income, and ensures that its most dedicated readers go straight to its homepage for their news. But Fernandez, in Guatemala, is much more concerned.
    https://www.theguardian.com/technolog...rnalists-democracy-guatemala-slovakia
    Voting 0
  6. Mobile Is Going To Crush Facebook. The same is absolutely true for every ad driven internet site. Google search results on mobile are no where near the number of results. Google has Android, but that still isn’t generating much , if any revenue.

    Video and video ads?? How can Youtube and video advertisers do well, if most online consumption is headed to mobile, and so few mobile users having unlimited data plans? That's even worst if many people will use exclusively their mobile internet access and no ADSL, fiber etc.. avoiding streaming video and downloads to stay within their data plan. Are you doing this already?
    http://www.forbes.com/sites/ericjacks.../24/mobile-is-going-to-crush-facebook
    Voting 0
  7. notification technology also enabled a hundred unsolicited interruptions into millions of lives, accelerating the arms race for people’s attention. Santamaria, 36, who now runs a startup after a stint as the head of mobile at Airbnb, says the technology he developed at Apple was not “inherently good or bad”. “This is a larger discussion for society,” he says. “Is it OK to shut off my phone when I leave work? Is it OK if I don’t get right back to you? Is it OK that I’m not ‘liking’ everything that goes through my Instagram screen?”
    Advertisement

    His then colleague, Marcellino, agrees. “Honestly, at no point was I sitting there thinking: let’s hook people,” he says. “It was all about the positives: these apps connect people, they have all these uses – ESPN telling you the game has ended, or WhatsApp giving you a message for free from your family member in Iran who doesn’t have a message plan.”

    A few years ago Marcellino, 33, left the Bay Area, and is now in the final stages of retraining to be a neurosurgeon. He stresses he is no expert on addiction, but says he has picked up enough in his medical training to know that technologies can affect the same neurological pathways as gambling and drug use. “These are the same circuits that make people seek out food, comfort, heat, sex,” he says.

    All of it, he says, is reward-based behaviour that activates the brain’s dopamine pathways. He sometimes finds himself clicking on the red icons beside his apps “to make them go away”, but is conflicted about the ethics of exploiting people’s psychological vulnerabilities. “It is not inherently evil to bring people back to your product,” he says. “It’s capitalism.”

    That, perhaps, is the problem. Roger McNamee, a venture capitalist who benefited from hugely profitable investments in Google and Facebook, has grown disenchanted with both companies, arguing that their early missions have been distorted by the fortunes they have been able to earn through advertising.

    It’s changing our democracy, and it's changing our ability to have the conversations and relationships we want
    Tristan Harris, former design ethicist at Google

    He identifies the advent of the smartphone as a turning point, raising the stakes in an arms race for people’s attention. “Facebook and Google assert with merit that they are giving users what they want,” McNamee says. “The same can be said about tobacco companies and drug dealers.”


    Williams and Harris left Google around the same time, and co-founded an advocacy group, Time Well Spent, that seeks to build public momentum for a change in the way big tech companies think about design. Williams finds it hard to comprehend why this issue is not “on the front page of every newspaper every day.

    “Eighty-seven percent of people wake up and go to sleep with their smartphones,” he says. The entire world now has a new prism through which to understand politics, and Williams worries the consequences are profound.

    The same forces that led tech firms to hook users with design tricks, he says, also encourage those companies to depict the world in a way that makes for compulsive, irresistible viewing. “The attention economy incentivises the design of technologies that grab our attention,” he says. “In so doing, it privileges our impulses over our intentions.”

    That means privileging what is sensational over what is nuanced, appealing to emotion, anger and outrage. The news media is increasingly working in service to tech companies, Williams adds, and must play by the rules of the attention economy to “sensationalise, bait and entertain in order to survive”.
    https://www.theguardian.com/technolog...icon-valley-dystopia?CMP=share_btn_fb
    Voting 0
  8. A study released this week revealed that 47% of Facebook users have swear words on their pages. A survey last week, meanwhile, showed that undergraduate men who talk about alcohol on Facebook tend to have more friends.
    http://edition.cnn.com/2011/TECH/soci...on_technology+%28RSS%3A+Technology%29
    Voting 0
  9. due piccole spunte, un grande casino di implicazioni.

    La vita e le relazioni sociali, in rete, si caratterizzano per il fatto che tante informazioni che nella vita reale sono implicite (o sconosciute), con il digitale diventano esplicite.

    Se vai dal fruttivendolo e ci chiacchieri, probabilmente non conosci nome e cognome, la scuola che ha frequentato, le sue preferenze, quali sono i suoi amici. Se lo vedi su Facebook tutte queste informazioni letteralmente «emergono». Diventano esplicite. E vengono storicizzate.

    E come le informazioni, anche i comportamenti delle persone.

    Questo ci dovrebbe portare a capire quanto effettivamente ci denudiamo in pubblico.

    2. Tempo e attenzione sono dati sensibili
    http://www.bookcafe.net/3-cose-su-whatsapp-e-sulla-dittatura-del-messaggio
    Voting 0
  10. Facebook goes public. Zuckerberg's job is to create value for shareholders. That means getting more than $4.50 a year for selling each user's information to advertisers. One of the ways Facebook is going to go about this value extraction is turning your every click into a sponsorship.
    http://finance.yahoo.com/blogs/breako...book-ipo-exploit-users-172215377.html
    Voting 0

Top of the page

First / Previous / Next / Last / Page 1 of 50 Online Bookmarks of M. Fioretti: Tags: facebook

About - Propulsed by SemanticScuttle