mfioretti: data ownership*

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  1. due piccole spunte, un grande casino di implicazioni.

    La vita e le relazioni sociali, in rete, si caratterizzano per il fatto che tante informazioni che nella vita reale sono implicite (o sconosciute), con il digitale diventano esplicite.

    Se vai dal fruttivendolo e ci chiacchieri, probabilmente non conosci nome e cognome, la scuola che ha frequentato, le sue preferenze, quali sono i suoi amici. Se lo vedi su Facebook tutte queste informazioni letteralmente «emergono». Diventano esplicite. E vengono storicizzate.

    E come le informazioni, anche i comportamenti delle persone.

    Questo ci dovrebbe portare a capire quanto effettivamente ci denudiamo in pubblico.

    2. Tempo e attenzione sono dati sensibili
    http://www.bookcafe.net/3-cose-su-whatsapp-e-sulla-dittatura-del-messaggio
    Voting 0
  2. La vita e le relazioni sociali, in rete, si caratterizzano per il fatto che tante informazioni che nella vita reale sono implicite (o sconosciute), con il digitale diventano esplicite.
    Se vai dal fruttivendolo e ci chiacchieri, probabilmente non conosci nome e cognome, la scuola che ha frequentato, le sue preferenze, quali sono i suoi amici. Se lo vedi su Facebook tutte queste informazioni letteralmente «emergono». Diventano esplicite. E vengono storicizzate.
    E come le informazioni, anche i comportamenti delle persone.

    Questo ci dovrebbe portare a capire quanto effettivamente ci denudiamo in pubblico. Uso la parola «denudare» non a caso. I vestiti sono una delle nostre protezioni personali. Ci riparano dalla vista, tengono per noi ciò che riteniamo più intimo.
    Uno degli esempi più potenti per far capire quanto effettivamente riveliamo di noi è l’idea del vestito che diventa più trasparente man mano che condividiamo informazioni, denudandoci. Mostra su un piano fisico le implicazioni di quanto facciamo -spesso senza curarcene- nello spazio immateriale.
    http://www.3ders.org/articles/2014061...kin-as-you-give-away-data-online.html
    Voting 0
  3. The destroyed archives included documents stored for Argentine corporations and banks, said Buenos Aires security minister Guillermo Montenegro.

    The cause wasn’t immediately clear. Berni said the company’s on-site firefighters shared some details with authorities, and Iron Mountain said it too will investigate.

    “All of this will end up in court,” Berni said, declining to make any details public.

    If the cause is found to be arson, it wouldn’t be the first time for Boston-based Iron Mountain Inc., which manages, stores and protects information for more than 156,000 companies and organizations in 36 countries. Fire investigators blamed arson for blazes that destroyed its warehouses in New Jersey in 1997 and London in 2006, prompting rounds of legal claims over lost records.
    http://www.washingtonpost.com/busines...e70-11e3-878e-d76656564a01_story.html
    Voting 0
  4. Tent is a communications protocol. There is no limit to the type of data or apps it can support. Apps can be “social”, collaborative, or meant for storing private information. Web apps, and native desktop and mobile apps for all operating systems are possible.
    Why Tent?

    Tent is generic and decentralized. Users aren't stuck in a walled garden. If they choose they can host their own server and control their data and identity. Developers aren't locked into a single platform. Anyone can build any kind of app and there are no API keys to be revoked later. There are no limits or central authorities to censor or intermediate communication, invade privacy, or take control.
    Get Started

    To get started with Tent, you need a Tent server. You can use a Tent host like Tent.is or host your own.
    https://tent.io/about
    Voting 0
  5. Moves, the fitness-tracking app recently acquired by Facebook, has changed its privacy policy to allow broader sharing of user data, including with Facebook.

    As recently as Friday, Moves’s privacy policy said the company did not “disclose an individual user’s data to third parties,” without a user’s consent, unless compelled by law enforcement. The policy said it would stay in place even if Moves were acquired.

    On Monday, the policy permitted a wider range of data sharing. “We may share information, including personally identifying information, with our Affiliates (companies that are part of our corporate groups of companies, including but not limited to Facebook) to help provide, understand, and improve our Services,” the policy says.

    The policy change highlights a tricky subject when Facebook acquires companies. Facebook taps the information its users post to target ads to them. But some of the companies it acquires have made promises not to employ user data for ads, or to share data at all.

    In February, Facebook agreed to acquire mobile-messaging service WhatsApp for $19 billion. A Facebook spokesman said WhatsApp wouldn’t share information with Facebook, but said that policy could change in the future. The deal hasn’t closed.
    http://blogs.wsj.com/digits/2014/05/0...deal-moves-app-changes-privacy-policy
    Voting 0
  6. Both Amazon Web Services (AWS) and Google were keen to get on the framework for the second iteration of the government’s G-Cloud platform, but were ultimately denied, TechWeekEurope has learned.

    It had been unclear whether Amazon and Google simply didn’t want a piece of the G-Cloud pie or whether they were shunned by the government. The suppliers may also have been unimpressed by the terms offered by the G-Cloud.

    But a Freedom of Information (FOI) request lodged by TechWeekEurope with the Cabinet Office has revealed that of the 662 expressions of interest received for G-Cloud ii, the cloud giants put in two of them. They were not included in the 458 suppliers who made it onto the framework, however.

    None of the parties, from AWS to Google to the government itself, have explained why those two behemoths of the industry did not make it onto the framework
    http://www.techweekeurope.co.uk/news/...le-g-cloud-security-government-100303
    Voting 0
  7. I see personal programming as the latest in a series of revolutions in which individuals have gained huge advances in power. In each of these following cases, individuals could do far more than could companies and large organizations:

    Computing, thanks to the PC.

    Communications, thanks to the Internet.

    Portable computing and communications, thanks the smartphone.

    Programming, with...well, that's what's next. Read on.

    We need to be able to program stuff in our own lives and in how we interact with two other domains—and to do so independently, outside the control of any centralized entity or service:

    The Internet of Things.

    The portfolio of API-based services that are what large organizations need to become, whether they like it or not.

    It's very early in the future that will grow here, but there are some early efforts that should invite our interest.
    http://www.linuxjournal.com/content/android-independence
    Voting 0
  8. With the cloud, you don't own anything. You already signed it away
    http://www.google.com/hostednews/afp/....3dc7a79d06ad7dc82f701613531da926.671
    Voting 0
  9. Apple's new iBooks 2 initiative has the potential to vastly improve the K-12 learning experience... However, the proprietary nature of the software means that publishers, parents, and schools will be locked into Apple's ecosystem.

    It's an ecosystem so expensive that it will only help the privileged few.
    http://www.foxnews.com/scitech/2012/0...most-children-behind/?intcmp=trending
    Voting 0
  10. Cook was characteristically passionate about all three topics. A theme that has persisted following his appearance on Charlie Rose late last year to define how Apple handled encryption, his public letter on Apple’s new security page in the wake of the celebrity nude hacking incidents and his speech earlier this year at President Obama’s Summit on Cybersecurity at Stanford — an event which was notably not attended by other Silicon Valley CEOs like Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg, Yahoo’s Marissa Mayer and Google’s Larry Page and Eric Schmidt.

    Cook lost no time in directing comments at companies (obviously, though not explicitly) like Facebook and Google, which rely on advertising to users based on the data they collect from them for a portion, if not a majority, of their income.

    “I’m speaking to you from Silicon Valley, where some of the most prominent and successful companies have built their businesses by lulling their customers into complacency about their personal information,” said Cook. “They’re gobbling up everything they can learn about you and trying to monetize it. We think that’s wrong. And it’s not the kind of company that Apple wants to be.”

    Cook went on to state, as he has before when talking about products like Apple Pay, that Apple ‘doesn’t want your data.’

    They’re gobbling up everything they can learn about you and trying to monetize it. We think that’s wrong.

    — Tim Cook

    “We don’t think you should ever have to trade it for a service you think is free but actually comes at a very high cost. This is especially true now that we’re storing data about our health, our finances and our homes on our devices,” Cook went on, getting even more explicit when talking about user privacy.

    “We believe the customer should be in control of their own information. You might like these so-called free services, but we don’t think they’re worth having your email, your search history and now even your family photos data mined and sold off for god knows what advertising purpose. And we think some day, customers will see this for what it is.”

    That, in case you missed it, is an epic subtweet of Google’s Photos product, which was just rolled out at I/O.The fact that Photos is free of charge, and Apple’s products are not likely spurred the talk about “very high costs.”

    That product uploads all of your photos, with unlimited storage, to Google’s cloud, organizing, improving and giving you access to a deep history of your images. By many accounts, Photos is a fantastic product, but even early on people have begun to point out the obvious tradeoff that you’re making when you sign up.

    Encryption

    Cook then switched gears to talk about encryption — directly addressing the efforts by policy makers to force Apple to offer a ‘master key’ that would allow government agencies access to consumer devices.

    “There’s another attack on our civil liberties that we see heating up every day — it’s the battle over encryption. Some in Washington are hoping to undermine the ability of ordinary citizens to encrypt their data,” said Cook.

    “We think this is incredibly dangerous. We’ve been offering encryption tools in our products for years, and we’re going to stay on that path. We think it’s a critical feature for our customers who want to keep their data secure. For years we’ve offered encryption services like iMessage and FaceTime because we believe the contents of your text messages and your video chats is none of our business.”

    The U.S. Department of Homeland Security has been waging a war on “pervasive encryption,” painting it as an enabler of terrorism. Every security researcher and logical human being on the planet understands that this is ridiculous. And Cook is one of them.

    “If you put a key under the mat for the cops, a burglar can find it, too. Criminals are using every technology tool at their disposal to hack into people’s accounts. If they know there’s a key hidden somewhere, they won’t stop until they find it,” Cook continued.

    “Removing encryption tools from our products altogether, as some in Washington would like us to do, would only hurt law-abiding citizens who rely on us to protect their data. The bad guys will still encrypt; it’s easy to do and readily available.”

    Cook then took it a step further, noting that weakening encryption could have a ‘chilling effect’ on our First Amendment rights.

    The bad guys will still encrypt; it’s easy to do and readily available.

    — Tim Cook

    “Now, we have a deep respect for law enforcement, and we work together with them in many areas, but on this issue we disagree. So let me be crystal clear — weakening encryption, or taking it away, harms good people that are using it for the right reasons. And ultimately, I believe it has a chilling effect on our First Amendment rights and undermines our country’s founding principles.”
    http://techcrunch.com/2015/06/02/appl...hcrunch+%28TechCrunch%29#.ph1qij:nbrA
    Voting 0

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