mfioretti: data ownership*

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  1. due piccole spunte, un grande casino di implicazioni.

    La vita e le relazioni sociali, in rete, si caratterizzano per il fatto che tante informazioni che nella vita reale sono implicite (o sconosciute), con il digitale diventano esplicite.

    Se vai dal fruttivendolo e ci chiacchieri, probabilmente non conosci nome e cognome, la scuola che ha frequentato, le sue preferenze, quali sono i suoi amici. Se lo vedi su Facebook tutte queste informazioni letteralmente «emergono». Diventano esplicite. E vengono storicizzate.

    E come le informazioni, anche i comportamenti delle persone.

    Questo ci dovrebbe portare a capire quanto effettivamente ci denudiamo in pubblico.

    2. Tempo e attenzione sono dati sensibili
    http://www.bookcafe.net/3-cose-su-whatsapp-e-sulla-dittatura-del-messaggio
    Voting 0
  2. La vita e le relazioni sociali, in rete, si caratterizzano per il fatto che tante informazioni che nella vita reale sono implicite (o sconosciute), con il digitale diventano esplicite.
    Se vai dal fruttivendolo e ci chiacchieri, probabilmente non conosci nome e cognome, la scuola che ha frequentato, le sue preferenze, quali sono i suoi amici. Se lo vedi su Facebook tutte queste informazioni letteralmente «emergono». Diventano esplicite. E vengono storicizzate.
    E come le informazioni, anche i comportamenti delle persone.

    Questo ci dovrebbe portare a capire quanto effettivamente ci denudiamo in pubblico. Uso la parola «denudare» non a caso. I vestiti sono una delle nostre protezioni personali. Ci riparano dalla vista, tengono per noi ciò che riteniamo più intimo.
    Uno degli esempi più potenti per far capire quanto effettivamente riveliamo di noi è l’idea del vestito che diventa più trasparente man mano che condividiamo informazioni, denudandoci. Mostra su un piano fisico le implicazioni di quanto facciamo -spesso senza curarcene- nello spazio immateriale.
    http://www.3ders.org/articles/2014061...kin-as-you-give-away-data-online.html
    Voting 0
  3. The destroyed archives included documents stored for Argentine corporations and banks, said Buenos Aires security minister Guillermo Montenegro.

    The cause wasn’t immediately clear. Berni said the company’s on-site firefighters shared some details with authorities, and Iron Mountain said it too will investigate.

    “All of this will end up in court,” Berni said, declining to make any details public.

    If the cause is found to be arson, it wouldn’t be the first time for Boston-based Iron Mountain Inc., which manages, stores and protects information for more than 156,000 companies and organizations in 36 countries. Fire investigators blamed arson for blazes that destroyed its warehouses in New Jersey in 1997 and London in 2006, prompting rounds of legal claims over lost records.
    http://www.washingtonpost.com/busines...e70-11e3-878e-d76656564a01_story.html
    Voting 0
  4. Journalists have been asking me whether the revulsion against the abuse of Facebook data could be a turning point for the campaign to recover privacy. That could happen, if the public makes its campaign broader and deeper.

    Broader, meaning extending to all surveillance systems, not just Facebook. Deeper, meaning to advance from regulating the use of data to regulating the accumulation of data. Because surveillance is so pervasive, restoring privacy is necessarily a big change, and requires powerful measures.
    After the Facebook scandal it’s time to base the digital economy on public v private ownership of data
    Evgeny Morozov
    Read more

    The surveillance imposed on us today far exceeds that of the Soviet Union. For freedom and democracy’s sake, we need to eliminate most of it. There are so many ways to use data to hurt people that the only safe database is the one that was never collected. Thus, instead of the EU’s approach of mainly regulating how personal data may be used (in its General Data Protection Regulation or GDPR), I propose a law to stop systems from collecting personal data.

    The robust way to do that, the way that can’t be set aside at the whim of a government, is to require systems to be built so as not to collect data about a person. The basic principle is that a system must be designed not to collect certain data, if its basic function can be carried out without that data.

    Data about who travels where is particularly sensitive, because it is an ideal basis for repressing any chosen target. We can take the London trains and buses as a case for study.

    The Transport for London digital payment card system centrally records the trips any given Oyster or bank card has paid for. When a passenger feeds the card digitally, the system associates the card with the passenger’s identity. This adds up to complete surveillance.

    I expect the transport system can justify this practice under the GDPR’s rules. My proposal, by contrast, would require the system to stop tracking who goes where. The card’s basic function is to pay for transport. That can be done without centralising that data, so the transport system would have to stop doing so. When it accepts digital payments, it should do so through an anonymous payment system.
    Advertisement

    Frills on the system, such as the feature of letting a passenger review the list of past journeys, are not part of the basic function, so they can’t justify incorporating any additional surveillance.
    https://www.theguardian.com/commentis...ata-law-privacy-big-tech-surveillance
    Voting 0
  5. Tent is a communications protocol. There is no limit to the type of data or apps it can support. Apps can be “social”, collaborative, or meant for storing private information. Web apps, and native desktop and mobile apps for all operating systems are possible.
    Why Tent?

    Tent is generic and decentralized. Users aren't stuck in a walled garden. If they choose they can host their own server and control their data and identity. Developers aren't locked into a single platform. Anyone can build any kind of app and there are no API keys to be revoked later. There are no limits or central authorities to censor or intermediate communication, invade privacy, or take control.
    Get Started

    To get started with Tent, you need a Tent server. You can use a Tent host like Tent.is or host your own.
    https://tent.io/about
    Voting 0
  6. Moves, the fitness-tracking app recently acquired by Facebook, has changed its privacy policy to allow broader sharing of user data, including with Facebook.

    As recently as Friday, Moves’s privacy policy said the company did not “disclose an individual user’s data to third parties,” without a user’s consent, unless compelled by law enforcement. The policy said it would stay in place even if Moves were acquired.

    On Monday, the policy permitted a wider range of data sharing. “We may share information, including personally identifying information, with our Affiliates (companies that are part of our corporate groups of companies, including but not limited to Facebook) to help provide, understand, and improve our Services,” the policy says.

    The policy change highlights a tricky subject when Facebook acquires companies. Facebook taps the information its users post to target ads to them. But some of the companies it acquires have made promises not to employ user data for ads, or to share data at all.

    In February, Facebook agreed to acquire mobile-messaging service WhatsApp for $19 billion. A Facebook spokesman said WhatsApp wouldn’t share information with Facebook, but said that policy could change in the future. The deal hasn’t closed.
    http://blogs.wsj.com/digits/2014/05/0...deal-moves-app-changes-privacy-policy
    Voting 0
  7. Both Amazon Web Services (AWS) and Google were keen to get on the framework for the second iteration of the government’s G-Cloud platform, but were ultimately denied, TechWeekEurope has learned.

    It had been unclear whether Amazon and Google simply didn’t want a piece of the G-Cloud pie or whether they were shunned by the government. The suppliers may also have been unimpressed by the terms offered by the G-Cloud.

    But a Freedom of Information (FOI) request lodged by TechWeekEurope with the Cabinet Office has revealed that of the 662 expressions of interest received for G-Cloud ii, the cloud giants put in two of them. They were not included in the 458 suppliers who made it onto the framework, however.

    None of the parties, from AWS to Google to the government itself, have explained why those two behemoths of the industry did not make it onto the framework
    http://www.techweekeurope.co.uk/news/...le-g-cloud-security-government-100303
    Voting 0
  8. I see personal programming as the latest in a series of revolutions in which individuals have gained huge advances in power. In each of these following cases, individuals could do far more than could companies and large organizations:

    Computing, thanks to the PC.

    Communications, thanks to the Internet.

    Portable computing and communications, thanks the smartphone.

    Programming, with...well, that's what's next. Read on.

    We need to be able to program stuff in our own lives and in how we interact with two other domains—and to do so independently, outside the control of any centralized entity or service:

    The Internet of Things.

    The portfolio of API-based services that are what large organizations need to become, whether they like it or not.

    It's very early in the future that will grow here, but there are some early efforts that should invite our interest.
    http://www.linuxjournal.com/content/android-independence
    Voting 0
  9. With the cloud, you don't own anything. You already signed it away
    http://www.google.com/hostednews/afp/....3dc7a79d06ad7dc82f701613531da926.671
    Voting 0
  10. Apple's new iBooks 2 initiative has the potential to vastly improve the K-12 learning experience... However, the proprietary nature of the software means that publishers, parents, and schools will be locked into Apple's ecosystem.

    It's an ecosystem so expensive that it will only help the privileged few.
    http://www.foxnews.com/scitech/2012/0...most-children-behind/?intcmp=trending
    Voting 0

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